3 added 162 characters in body
source | link

I saw a Youtube video on this a while back*....can't find it now, but I'll post whatever I remember.

Basically, the way knife-sharpening works is that you shave off little bits of metal, in order to make the edge of your knife V-shaped. Ideally, you'd use a steel or a specialized stone for this, but if you don't have any, here are some things you could use instead:

  • Top of a car window
  • Bottom of a ceramic mug (see also this article by Lifehacker)
  • You might use cement, but only for about two seconds, and only in place of a really coarse stone (=for beginning stage sharpening)
  • If you're camping, you might use a straight metal tent-peg in place of a steel (my suggestion, not from the video)
  • If you're near a river, flat river stones might help you (but try to find a big one, for ease-of-use)
  • Also suggested by Crazy Russian Hacker, if I remember correctly, is to use a leather belt as a strop, basically running the knife backwards over the leather belt, to give it a nicer finish. This may not help you if your knife is severely out of shape, but it could work to make an almost-good knife perfect. I've done this myself when I wanted to show my knife (pictured in my gravatar) to a professional shochet, and although I had my stones with me, I didn't have time to soak them and sharpen my knife properly. I just took off my belt, ran the knife over it several times, and the knife really improved a lot. Kudos to Jon for reminding me of this hack :)

I would suggest that you do NOT

  • Use another knife, because you have a good chance of ruining at least one of your knives, if not both of them.

*IIRC, it's by a guy who calls himself "Crazy Russian Hacker," but I can't find that video now

I saw a Youtube video on this a while back*....can't find it now, but I'll post whatever I remember.

Basically, the way knife-sharpening works is that you shave off little bits of metal, in order to make the edge of your knife V-shaped. Ideally, you'd use a steel or a specialized stone for this, but if you don't have any, here are some things you could use instead:

  • Top of a car window
  • Bottom of a ceramic mug
  • You might use cement, but only for about two seconds, and only in place of a really coarse stone (=for beginning stage sharpening)
  • If you're camping, you might use a straight metal tent-peg in place of a steel (my suggestion, not from the video)
  • If you're near a river, flat river stones might help you (but try to find a big one, for ease-of-use)
  • Also suggested by Crazy Russian Hacker, if I remember correctly, is to use a leather belt as a strop, basically running the knife backwards over the leather belt, to give it a nicer finish. This may not help you if your knife is severely out of shape, but it could work to make an almost-good knife perfect. I've done this myself when I wanted to show my knife (pictured in my gravatar) to a professional shochet, and although I had my stones with me, I didn't have time to soak them and sharpen my knife properly. I just took off my belt, ran the knife over it several times, and the knife really improved a lot. Kudos to Jon for reminding me of this hack :)

I would suggest that you do NOT

  • Use another knife, because you have a good chance of ruining at least one of your knives, if not both of them.

*IIRC, it's by a guy who calls himself "Crazy Russian Hacker," but I can't find that video now

I saw a Youtube video on this a while back*....can't find it now, but I'll post whatever I remember.

Basically, the way knife-sharpening works is that you shave off little bits of metal, in order to make the edge of your knife V-shaped. Ideally, you'd use a steel or a specialized stone for this, but if you don't have any, here are some things you could use instead:

  • Top of a car window
  • Bottom of a ceramic mug (see also this article by Lifehacker)
  • You might use cement, but only for about two seconds, and only in place of a really coarse stone (=for beginning stage sharpening)
  • If you're camping, you might use a straight metal tent-peg in place of a steel (my suggestion, not from the video)
  • If you're near a river, flat river stones might help you (but try to find a big one, for ease-of-use)
  • Also suggested by Crazy Russian Hacker, if I remember correctly, is to use a leather belt as a strop, basically running the knife backwards over the leather belt, to give it a nicer finish. This may not help you if your knife is severely out of shape, but it could work to make an almost-good knife perfect. I've done this myself when I wanted to show my knife (pictured in my gravatar) to a professional shochet, and although I had my stones with me, I didn't have time to soak them and sharpen my knife properly. I just took off my belt, ran the knife over it several times, and the knife really improved a lot. Kudos to Jon for reminding me of this hack :)

I would suggest that you do NOT

  • Use another knife, because you have a good chance of ruining at least one of your knives, if not both of them.

*IIRC, it's by a guy who calls himself "Crazy Russian Hacker," but I can't find that video now

2 added leather belt, made each option clearer by bolding the relevant text in each bullet
source | link

I saw a Youtube video on this a while back*....can't find it now, but I'll post whatever I remember.

Basically, the way knife-sharpening works is that you shave off little bits of metal, in order to make the edge of your knife V-shaped. Ideally, you'd use a steel or a specialized stone for this, but if you don't have any, here are some things you could use instead:

  • Top of a car windowTop of a car window
  • Bottom of a ceramic mugBottom of a ceramic mug
  • You might use cementcement, but only for about two seconds, and only in place of a really coarse stone (=for beginning stage sharpening)
  • If you're camping, you might use a straight metal tent-pegtent-peg in place of a steel (my suggestion, not from the video)
  • If you're near a river, flat river stonesflat river stones might help you (but try to find a big one, for ease-of-use)
  • Also suggested by Crazy Russian Hacker, if I remember correctly, is to use a leather belt as a strop, basically running the knife backwards over the leather belt, to give it a nicer finish. This may not help you if your knife is severely out of shape, but it could work to make an almost-good knife perfect. I've done this myself when I wanted to show my knife (pictured in my gravatar) to a professional shochet, and although I had my stones with me, I didn't have time to soak them and sharpen my knife properly. I just took off my belt, ran the knife over it several times, and the knife really improved a lot. Kudos to Jon for reminding me of this hack :)

I would suggest that you do NOT

  • Use another knifeanother knife, because you have a good chance of ruining at least one of your knives, if not both of them.

*IIRC, it's by a guy who calls himself "Crazy Russian Hacker," but I can't find that video now

I saw a Youtube video on this a while back*....can't find it now, but I'll post whatever I remember.

Basically, the way knife-sharpening works is that you shave off little bits of metal, in order to make the edge of your knife V-shaped. Ideally, you'd use a steel or a specialized stone for this, but if you don't have any, here are some things you could use instead:

  • Top of a car window
  • Bottom of a ceramic mug
  • You might use cement, but only for about two seconds, and only in place of a really coarse stone (=for beginning stage sharpening)
  • If you're camping, you might use a straight metal tent-peg in place of a steel (my suggestion, not from the video)
  • If you're near a river, flat river stones might help you (but try to find a big one, for ease-of-use)

I would suggest that you do NOT

  • Use another knife, because you have a good chance of ruining at least one of your knives, if not both of them.

*IIRC, it's by a guy who calls himself "Crazy Russian Hacker," but I can't find that video now

I saw a Youtube video on this a while back*....can't find it now, but I'll post whatever I remember.

Basically, the way knife-sharpening works is that you shave off little bits of metal, in order to make the edge of your knife V-shaped. Ideally, you'd use a steel or a specialized stone for this, but if you don't have any, here are some things you could use instead:

  • Top of a car window
  • Bottom of a ceramic mug
  • You might use cement, but only for about two seconds, and only in place of a really coarse stone (=for beginning stage sharpening)
  • If you're camping, you might use a straight metal tent-peg in place of a steel (my suggestion, not from the video)
  • If you're near a river, flat river stones might help you (but try to find a big one, for ease-of-use)
  • Also suggested by Crazy Russian Hacker, if I remember correctly, is to use a leather belt as a strop, basically running the knife backwards over the leather belt, to give it a nicer finish. This may not help you if your knife is severely out of shape, but it could work to make an almost-good knife perfect. I've done this myself when I wanted to show my knife (pictured in my gravatar) to a professional shochet, and although I had my stones with me, I didn't have time to soak them and sharpen my knife properly. I just took off my belt, ran the knife over it several times, and the knife really improved a lot. Kudos to Jon for reminding me of this hack :)

I would suggest that you do NOT

  • Use another knife, because you have a good chance of ruining at least one of your knives, if not both of them.

*IIRC, it's by a guy who calls himself "Crazy Russian Hacker," but I can't find that video now

1
source | link

I saw a Youtube video on this a while back*....can't find it now, but I'll post whatever I remember.

Basically, the way knife-sharpening works is that you shave off little bits of metal, in order to make the edge of your knife V-shaped. Ideally, you'd use a steel or a specialized stone for this, but if you don't have any, here are some things you could use instead:

  • Top of a car window
  • Bottom of a ceramic mug
  • You might use cement, but only for about two seconds, and only in place of a really coarse stone (=for beginning stage sharpening)
  • If you're camping, you might use a straight metal tent-peg in place of a steel (my suggestion, not from the video)
  • If you're near a river, flat river stones might help you (but try to find a big one, for ease-of-use)

I would suggest that you do NOT

  • Use another knife, because you have a good chance of ruining at least one of your knives, if not both of them.

*IIRC, it's by a guy who calls himself "Crazy Russian Hacker," but I can't find that video now