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I noticed that my LED TV have drops of wood varnish on my LED TV's screen. It is annoying especially when I'm playing video games (I keep falling victim, thought it was an island on a horizon of sea).

My father loves to coat varnish on our wood furniture, and accidentally drops some small wood varnish dot on my LED TV's screen.

How can I remove it? Any help is appreciated.

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    You may want to ask this on Home Improvement Exchange, I'd imagine they know more about removing such materials. – Carl Nov 23 '15 at 21:18
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It's likely the only chance you have is if the varnish is water based; otherwise, it's probably chemically bonded to the screen surface and there'll be no way to remove it without taking a chunk out of the screen. You might try scraping with the edge of a credit card held very carefully so the entire edge is in contact; this will minimize the risk of scratching, but it's still likely you'll make a much more noticeable mark.

You might also check whether you can get a replacement screen cover for your television. Replacing the screen cover is likely to be the most effective repair.

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I would expect using a solvent could make the situation worse by potentially damaging the surface of the LED screen.

A potential approach would be to dab it with a tiny amounts of turpentine to loosen it and then use a sharp kitchen knife or stanley blade and gently scrape the spot until it is removed from the LED surface without damaging the LED surface itself.

  • Turpentine is also likely to damage the screen surface. In fact, it's likely the varnish has chemically bonded to the plastic anti-glare surface on the screen, and will be permanent (though if it's water based varnish, it might not have done this). Scraping with a blade will probably remove the varnish, but may make an even more visible (larger) mar on the screen. – Zeiss Ikon Nov 23 '15 at 12:42
  • I agree turpentine would also likely damage the screen. My suggestion was to use very tiny amounts dabbed on to the surface of the wood varnish just to loosen it. Hopefully none/very little will touch the actual LED surface although it would be quite risky as it is an unproven method. – Liam Murphy Nov 24 '15 at 5:20
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As the usual solutions of using various kind of solvents have the potential of damaging your screen, I would go ask someone professional how they would handle it.

Try asking at the shop were you bought it, or a shop selling LCD screens, and ask for their advice. Either on how to do it yourself, or if they can recommend someone to help you in your predicament.

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