13

Sometimes when I shave I accidently cut myself (usually due to haste). I was wondering what is the best way to stop the bleeding and gives the most comfort.

I heard the paper from cigarettes or toilet paper help, but the question is:

Are there any other ways to stop the bleeding and continue or finish up on the shave?

P.S. this is my first question on stack overflow, so tips and pointers are welcome to better my questions and answers!

  • 5
    I'm going to point this out, as most people don't even know it exists. A Styptic Pencil is designed for this exact purpose. It's a little white stick that costs about 3 bucks. amazon.com/Clubman-Styptic-Pencil-Travel-Size/dp/B00E5QJC04 – goodguy5 Apr 11 '16 at 13:55
  • 1
    Also, google is your friend here. While I support this question because I haven't seen it on this site, it has been answered elsewhere. (I own a styptic pencil, as mentioned above, but never use it as I don't cut myself.) – goodguy5 Apr 11 '16 at 13:58
11

The simplest way to stop bleeding from a minor cut like a shaving nick is to apply direct pressure (a clean fingertip does the job nicely) for at least two minutes.

If you take blood thinners or have a low-grade clotting disorder, it might take ten to thirty minutes or more for clotting to occur, and the time must be restarted if you remove the pressure and bleeding restarts. If you have full-blown hemophilia, you shouldn't be shaving at all, by any method (even an electric razor can skim off raised skin around a follicle and cause bleeding), though your doctor may suggest a trimmer with a suitable guard to control beard length.

Obviously, if you have to hold pressure for ten minutes or more to stop bleeding, you'll need to reapply your choice of shaving foam or soap before you can finish shaving, but if that applies to you, you should consider shaving by a method less likely to cause bleeding, such as an electric foil shaver.

  • 1
    With all due respect, this is a medical remedy rather than a lifehack. – Varun Nair Apr 11 '16 at 12:28
  • 3
    Medical problem (bleeding), medical or first aid remedy. There isn't anything simpler than direct pressure, and for most people with common shaving-cut size wounds it'll get the job done fast enough to finish shaving before the foam dries out. – Zeiss Ikon Apr 11 '16 at 12:50
  • 1
    @VarunKN And it is best pointed out that if it were to bleed heavily or for a long period of time that you may have another issue to deal with. – L.B. Jun 2 '16 at 3:28
3

These are 5 alternatives to toilet paper:

1. Deodorant

Most antiperspirants contain aluminum chloride that can, in addition to shrinking sweat glands, constrict blood vessels and clot a nick.

2. Lip Balm

Smearing on a little ChapStick or Vaseline works like a seal—plus it’ll keep bigger cuts from forming unsightly scabs.

3. Ice Cubes

Like swimming pools and your package, the cold shrinks blood vessels, enabling a clot to form fast.

4. Mouthwash

The alcohol in solutions like Listerine acts as an astringent, which halts blood flow by causing tissues to contract.

5. Eye Drops

Red eye relievers like Visine work similarly on cuts: they slow down bleeding by constricting blood vessels

  • Isn't using deodorant on wounds really bad? – Kiwu Apr 13 '16 at 6:36
  • @Kiwi it shouldn't. Also it contains aluminium which is the ingredient that we need to heal – Wha2wear Apr 14 '16 at 6:09
  • just wondering is all, because it contains aluminium indeed, but also contains other stuff which maybe harmful? – Kiwu Apr 14 '16 at 7:19
  • @Kiwi the deodorant is a product made specifically to apply in the skin. As all products, there are several types from soft to strong, but when use it as a remedy to heal the skin, you just need to apply a tiny bit :) – Wha2wear Apr 16 '16 at 7:13
  • 2
    -1 for deodorant. Most of the packages I've read say "don't apply to broken skin" or recommend not applying immediately after shaving under the arms, strongly implying they aren't good for your freshly cut face, either. – Zeiss Ikon Apr 26 '16 at 12:20
2

You can buy an Alum shaving block. These are very cheap, and when you make them wet, and then rub them (softly) over the cut, the alum will make it close.

I use one when shaving with a cut-throat razor. Not necessarily because of cuts, but it also helps with irritation I find.

protected by Community Jun 1 '16 at 14:19

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.