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I want to write on paper in front of me with a pencil like this picture. Will be doing some math and diagramming. I really like the feeling of sitting in front of a board and writing with pencil on it. http://i.imgur.com/wKL7Jp7.png

  1. What are some lifehacks to help achieve this?

  2. What's the most efficient way to have lots of paper on the corkboard for writing and be able to easily replace the sheets? I thought of perhaps one efficient way would be to find long thumbtacks and stacks of white paper with hole punches on the top middle of each and just rip off a sheet everytime I'm done with one. Let's kick around some ideas for this because this seems a bit hacky and inefficient

Some details:

  • Willing to spend maybe max of 100$ on this, don't think should be that complex or expensive
  • See why you can't just put a cork board hanging on the wall? No room for your legs.
    • Cork boards don't stand up by themselves upright. Need some way to keep board upright, stable enough to handle writing on it
    • Simpler and no construction/less construction required would be great
  • 1
    Some minimal construction would maybe be to nail two planks on the back in a reverse V shape so it stands upright? – Xylius Jul 3 '16 at 7:24
  • How large is your desired drawing surface? – Stan Jul 3 '16 at 23:28
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I had a similar desire and solved my needs by purchasing a flip chart at a stationery store (like Staples).

I bought 3 different kinds Flip-Chart paper to see which one I preferred. I got a pad with thinly-lined 1" squares, a plain unlined white one, and a newsprint one for only pencil. (Markers can't be used on newsprint b/c it bleeds through onto the sheet(s) under it.) I now buy them with squares in cartons of 4 pads.

The 25-sheet pads measure 24" X 34". They come with large holes punched along the top for attaching to an easel for presentations.

You can use a desk-easel to hold your existing board as a backing. Desk Easel support They are somewhat adjustable and come in different sizes and capacities. Some clip onto the desk edge with a tray for stuff. Alternative to that is to go all the way and get a desk-top flip-chart holder. Desktop flip chart

If these pads are too large, they can be cut down and re-padded by most any commercial offset printing house with a paper shear. Costs for cutting and padding will be minimal.

You don't even need to have them padded for convenience. Several thicknesses of chart paper can be stapled to a wood base or held by a paper clamp or "bull" clip.

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