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Just as a measure of safety, office have fire extinguishers. But one of its safety pin seems to be broken half the way. Replacing it now itself, being a solution, if I am in middle of a fire, how could I make use of the extinguisher? Fire extinguisher

  • In the middle of a fire I don't think you are going to make use of it. – paparazzo Dec 1 '16 at 12:52
  • Depending upon your jurisdiction - having an extinguisher with a faulty pin is a criminal offence. Replace the extinguisher. – Chenmunka Dec 1 '16 at 13:10
  • @Paparazzi I liked the joke brother, but what if it becomes your hope. – MANEESH MOHAN Dec 1 '16 at 13:46
  • It is not a joke. In the middle of a fire with a failed extinguisher your best course of action is to retreat. – paparazzo Dec 1 '16 at 13:53
  • If I knew of a situation like this before something was on fire, I'd probably remove the safety pin and replace it with something handy. New safety pins can be found fairly cheaply online, if that is not an option then I might consider some small items like 1.) A Toothpick 2.) A paperclip 3.) A safety pin – Sidney Dec 2 '16 at 1:38
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If you're in the middle of a fire, you shouldn't be posting on Lifehacks SE, you should be evacuating the building. (joke)

The general rule is, only fight a fire if it's either quite small, or you need to do so to clear an evacuation route. That said, if you were trapped by a fire and the only extinguisher in reach had this problem, you'd need some kind of tool to pull the remains of the pin out of the handles so you could activate the extinguisher. In an office environment, I'd look for scissors -- they can act a bit like a small-nose pliers or wire cutter, in terms of gripping the short straight end of the pin. Another option might be nail clippers (which many people carry with them) or a multi-tool (forbidden in some office environments because of attached knife blade, but pretty common otherwise -- I carry one every day).

One slightly out-of-the-box idea would be to very gently squeeze the handles to take the spring tension off the pin hole, and see if the pin will just drop out (turn the extinguisher on its side and shake) or strike the short end of the pin with the base of a stapler, paperweight, or similar, in hopes of driving it through so it doesn't lock the handles any longer.

  • Liked your joke, out of box idea seems to be good. – MANEESH MOHAN Dec 1 '16 at 13:50

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