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A 25kg/50lb bag of rice comes sealed with a string stitched along the opening. Short of cutting each stitch, is there an easier way of opening a bag of rice. I know there is a trick to untying a stitch and then it simply becomes a matter of pulling the string and it satisfying unstitches itself. Can some give a quick tip on how to do this.

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There is a "right" and a "wrong" side to start. Note that the seam is typically made with one string, which is exactly the reason it's so easy to unravel.

Look at the side with the loops. You'll notice the loops kind of "pointing" to one side. This is the side where you'll have to pull. In this case, to the left:

enter image description here

Now, look at the end of the string. Usually, there is no unravelling loop yet - which makes sense, considering the bags need to be shipped and handeled and should not open by accident. It's a bit hard to see, white on white, but here the end of the string keeps the last loop from unravelling.

enter image description here

You need to push/pull the end of the string through the last loop and you'll get a "free loop":

enter image description here

Pull, and the bag opens.

Now, if you have trouble finding the right way to fiddle the end loose, you can also snip the string right at the end of the bag (again: the loops show you the correct side), freeing the last loop. Then pull from the back side, where there is only one string visible. Note the "free" loop at the edge of the bag:

enter image description here

  • +1 very good answer. As it is not always easy to see where to start, if it does not work, try from the other end. – Willeke Apr 1 '17 at 9:38
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Looks like this is probably one good way of doing it. However, I just take a pair of scissors and cut off the top, string and all --- still end up with an open end except it's a wee bit shorter, which doesn't seem significant enough to make a functional difference in pouring out the rice. Was your question how to get the bag open, or was it confined to undoing the string?

  • I thought about that method and it (obviously) works. However, for some bag materials like some kinds of "woven plastic fabric", cutting can lead to lose fibers and serious fraying of the bag. – Stephie Apr 7 '17 at 4:36

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