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I recently started steam cooking and many recipes recommend wrapping meats in foil before steaming to lock in flavor.

I’ve also read about the dangers of aluminum foil leaching aluminum into food under heat. What can I use instead?

closed as off-topic by Chenmunka, Takkat, A J, nicael, holroy Apr 11 '18 at 20:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Does not seem to need a life hack — A "life hack" is a seemingly intractable problem that can be solved by thinking outside the box. Unfortunately, everyday "How to…" questions about learning a craft or new skill are outside the scope of this site. See about Lifehacks. If the author can show how this needs an "outside the box" solution, edit and 'flag' to reopen." – Chenmunka, Takkat, A J, nicael, holroy
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    This is one for cooking.stackexchange.com rather than for here. – Chenmunka Apr 4 '18 at 18:51
  • There are certainly lifehacks available for this kind of problem. It is not about cooking but about what to use to help seal in the meat. – Willeke Apr 15 '18 at 13:00
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On TV they use cling film, the plastic, for that. Each plastic has its melting temperature and they use one that is for a higher temperature than the meat will reach in this method of preparation.

Micro-wave cling film will certainly be able to handle the heat but you might want to use a few more layers as it has small holes in it.

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I suggest using a magical material called "Culinary" parchment.

Basically, it's a kind of non-adhesive paper that is perfect for baking, cooking, and roasting. It's inexpensive, 100% recyclable, and available anywhere on this planet. It's a good cook's secret material.

Nothing is faster, easier, or cheaper without any more pollution. Try it and you'll thank me. (Don't use the comments for that though.)

Although it doesn't cling, you can place the wrapped piece so that its weight prevents the meat or fish from unwrapping. (I couldn't think of an uncomplicated way to describe how.) Alternately, use an office stapler to hold the parchment closed.

Parchment will hold juices in and can be used for most everything except exposure to direct flame or close to a heating element.

  • I use wooden clothes peg of the lever/spring type to hold parchment paper parcels closed when doing en papillote, because I've never worked out a way to finish the twist that doesn't untwist on me. I assume that would work in a steamer as well. – Spagirl Apr 11 '18 at 12:37
  • @Spagirl Have you tried to use a stapler? – Stan Apr 11 '18 at 13:52
  • I don't need to, I have clothespegs! – Spagirl Apr 11 '18 at 14:11

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