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We live in a remote area far from the city and we have to bring in fire wood from from the jungle. We often forget to take our medical kit with us. In case we get bitten by a venomous snake (there are a lot in our jungle), what steps we can take to stop the poison from spreading into the body long enough, so that we can get the proper medical assistance?

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Do NOT wash the area of the bite or try to suck out the venom. It is extremely important to retain traces of venom for use with venom identification kits.

Do NOT incise or cut the bite, or apply a high tourniquet. Cutting or incising the bite won't help. High tourniquets are ineffective and can be fatal if released.

Do bandage firmly, splint and immobilise to stop the spread of venom. All the major medical associations recommend slowing the spread of venom by placing a folded pad over the bite area and then applying a firm bandage. It should not stop blood flow to the limb or congest the veins. Only remove the bandage in a medical facility, as the release of pressure will cause a rapid flow of venom through the bloodstream.

Do NOT allow the victim to walk or move their limbs. Use a splint or sling to minimise all limb movement. Put the patient on a stretcher or bring transportation to the patient. Do seek medical help immediately as the venom can cause severe damage to health and even death within a few hours.

Reference:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2017-11-26/youve-just-been-bitten-by-a-snake-—-what-do-you-do/9176728

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    Also take a picture of the snake or note its characteristics. I did hear of one nigerian man who killed the snake so it could be identified. The treatment depends upon the type of snake as their venoms work differently – bigbadmouse May 20 at 16:41

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