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When I buy a kebab roll somewhere and go home to eat, it gets cold. I'd like to eat it warm. If I use an oven to heat it up, the flatbread outside would get dried and the meat filling wouldn't get warm enough. If I use a microwave, I have to remove the tin foil, which would cause the structure to fall apart, since they just fold the flatbread a little bit and don't really roll the roll so much and the structure of the roll was actually maintained by the tin foil.

So, it there any why by which I can eat my kebab roll like a new one?

6

To reheat such things, my father would

  • Put the roll into a wet brown (kraft) paper bag.
  • Roll or fold the open end of the bag closed
  • Put it into a pre-heated oven to warm.

(The wet paper bag kept the roll moist while the contents were reheated.)

  • When the bag was dry, the roll was ready.
  • Unroll the roll and enjoy.

Good luck and Bon appetit.

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  • You can also use a toaster oven, if it'll fit inside. I've also had good luck using a Pizza Pizzazz when reheating more delicate items like this, such as fried foods and even pizza. – computercarguy Jan 22 at 18:10
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If the premise is really “as it was when I bought it”, the answer is “you can’t”.

If you are ok with the yufka getting a bit (or quite) soggy and veggies or salad limp, you can pop the whole roll, still wrapped in the foil, into a warm oven. Everything between 80C and maybe 150 C should work, heating time depends on various parameters like thickness of the roll, fillings, oven and roll temperature and the preference of the eater.

The results will be warm. The yufka will probably be rubbery on the outside and mushy on the inside, especially if the filling contains sauce and you chose a low temperature. It may also stick a bit to the foil, especially in a hotter oven.

If you want a crisper exterior, you can experiment with partially unwrapping after the reheating step and slightly toast the roll. How well that is going to work depends on how your seller assembled the thing and how overall soggy it is already.

I personally don’t recommend this approach. When I buy a Yufka (usually at a small vendor’s place), I eat it there and then, because they are best when fresh. It’s street food, not a packed meal. I rather have a lukewarm or cold roll at home, if eating on site is not possible.

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