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My grandpa's pajamas' waist elastic has loosened, and his pajamas are so loose as to drop to the floor. What life hack can permanently fasten his pajamas, so that he needn't wear a belt? Don't recommend anything sharp please like the pin below.

enter image description here

His pajamas are the sort that conceals the waist elastic like the following pictures, not the sort that exposes the string for you to access and tie.

enter image description here

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    The link you included describes at least a half-dozen different solutions for you to try. Why have none of them been workable? – Stan May 21 '20 at 22:00
  • @Stan They all require sewing. Is there something simpler? – NNOX Apps May 21 '20 at 22:31
  • Linking to a page which has a similar setup like this one (for no apparent reason) does reek a bit of spam. Just saying. – Stephie May 22 '20 at 13:57
  • And just for the sake of completeness: You apparently took a photo from the linked site and forgot the attribution. – Stephie May 22 '20 at 20:54
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When I was a child, I had this problem often. The solution applied in my family was to cut-open the sew concealing the elastic, not more than 1-2 cm (less than 1 inch). Pull the elastic, make a knot. If length is not OK, repeat doing the knot, in another position.

Note: If the elastic is really aged, then it is not an elastic anymore, it is a strange rope. In that case, replace the elastic, following the same procedure.

Note2: In our case, closing the "opening" was not really necessary, they never opened more as a consequence of use or washing. In this way, you can re-adjust in the future, as needed.

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  • Do you mean “cut open the seam” or the “stitching”? This works for waists where the elastic can move freely in a fabric tunnel. I am afraid it won’t work for the waistband pictured in the second photo. Although I am not 100% sure, I think it’s the kind where the elastic is stitched together with the fabric. – Stephie May 22 '20 at 13:54
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    I did not mean to cut the fabric, just the part creating the "tunnel". If the elastic is stitched together with the fabric, then this solution will help if the old elastic is left there, and a new elastic added. – virolino May 22 '20 at 14:14
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In both of the photos you include, notice that there is a "tunnel" through which a second elastic tape or cord can be threaded to use for repair. If the cut is small, no sewing is necessary.

You don't need a sewing machine or much technology beyond a needle and thread to accomplish this. Surgeons have been using these for hundreds of years to repair us.

If sewing is out of the question for some reason, there are fabric glues and tapes that will hold through multiple washes. I can attest to their effectiveness.

If this produces more bulk than you wish, you can use the same techniques to make a second waistband after trimming off the bulk of the first.

Good luck

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  • Note 2 by virolino (in a previous answer) applies in this case also. – Stan May 22 '20 at 14:23
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Pinch one inch of material from the waist, so it's folded over itself, making the waist 1-2" smaller. Then hold it in place with a binder clip. It may work better to fold the material over itself several times before clipping it in place with the binder clip.

enter image description here

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    ... and then fold the flaps down. – Stephie May 22 '20 at 18:08
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    … and it is adjustable. – Stan May 22 '20 at 18:36
  • @Stephie You can even remove the 2 silver handles if you want, after you clasp it in place. Just keep them handy so you can reattach them in order to open the binder clip later. – BrettFromLA May 22 '20 at 21:42
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    This will give an annoying bit of metal on the waist, better to use the 'shorten or replace the elastic' method in the other answer(s). – Willeke May 24 '20 at 16:28

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