0

Good ways to clean up "black stuff & staining" from powder coated MS items & bolts/ screws, post DIY mods at a Lathe heavy metal workshop?

Pic Collage: Anything anyone touches w/o washing hands has black stains all over. Only industrial workshop I have access to via a connect.

  • I basically got some drilling & threading done at this place as I know the folks who run it.

    • Workers hands are all black due to tons of lathe work being done there; mix of lubes, etc whatever applies to the lathing, drilling, threading.. metal work of this sort.

    • They never clean the parts as it is meant to go into industrial spaces - at most they do something called blackening before shipping it off.

    • No one gave my any inputs on what would work for me to clean these

  • I do not know what chemical or solvent or liquid to use to wash these off the formerly clean surfaces. Surely I cant use soap & water, nor will it work well.

  • I am a newbie with no such background and one fellow there said Collin spray (blue colored home use type of glass & multi purpose spray).

    • Not sure if he is educated on the space but I cant imagine washing these metal parts with soap & water.
  • What're the ways/ liquids to do it?

    • I will need to go there again for a few more and will come back with stained metal parts & bolts.

So, this would be a good "how to" if someone knows?

PS: US / UK Suggestions also welcome as long as I can source the product or translate that and its active chemical ingredient and find a local clone (in Asia).

enter image description here

7
  • 1
    A shot in the dark; the threaded rods look like they are adjusted to some position to support a load. So they are turned while supporting a load. In that case an extreme pressure lube may be used, commonly graphite or moly sulfide . Both are black materials that seem to get everywhere. The center rod in the bottom photo looks very much like it has a lube coating. If so, difficult to remove, wear gloves. What is MS ?. Nov 20 at 20:31
  • I guess mild steel. Nov 20 at 21:39
  • @blacksmith37 - MS / SS isnt it common for you folks? I basically got some drilling & threading done at this place as i know the folks who run it. Workers hands are all black due to tons of lathe work being done there; mix of lubes, etc whatever applies to the lathing, drilling, threading.. metal work of this sort. I do not know what chemical or solvent or liquid to use to wash these off the formerly clean surfaces. Surely I cant use soap & water, nor will it work well.
    – Alex S
    Nov 21 at 9:26
  • 1
    Sometimed machined parts are left deliberately greasy to protect them from corrosion - mild steel is not rustproof. You could wear protective gloves to load the parts into a box or plastic bag so you don't have to touch them. If I wanted to degrease a part, I would use an old brush and dish soap, rinse and and allow to dry thoroughly. For a quick partial clean-up, just wipe with a cotton rag. Nov 21 at 17:09
  • 1
    "Machined parts" - parts made by a machine. This is just shopping, not a hack, for example degreaser. Nov 21 at 17:46
0

The usual way to remove industrial lubricant is to:

  • Remove as much excess from the surface as possible with absorbent 'wipes.' You may wish to wear protective coverings for your hands and face.
  • Dissolve the remainder in a suitable detergent solution using a brush or with deionized water in an ultrasonic cleaner.
  • Rinse the cleaned objects.
  • Thoroughly dry them.

Good luck.

0

The Lifehack's way to remove industrial lubricant is to:

  • Remove as much excess from the surface as possible with absorbent 'wipes.'
    You may wish to wear protective coverings for your hands and face.
  • Soak the parts in WD-40®.
  • Wipe "dry".

Good luck.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.