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This question already has an answer here:

I've found that often, in the winter, I collect static electricity like nothing else. I'm not sure if its the cold, or my coat, or something else, but it's something I'd rather avoid, if I can.

What can I do to minimize the effects of static electricity?

marked as duplicate by Mooseman, Adam Zuckerman, Jon, michaelpri, subjectivist Feb 14 '15 at 3:41

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  • Always use fabric conditioner in the last rinse when you wash your clothes, specially on synthetics, helps enormously. – Bamboo Feb 14 '15 at 12:16
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Cold (winter) air has less water (moisture) in it. So, if you wanted to reduce static in your home, you could use a humidifier in the winter.

Water in the air is what steals away extra electrons that hang out on us, so that's why it matters. To see the effect in real life, and how powerful it is, take a balloon and rub it against your hair or fleece. The rubber on the balloon will steal some electrons from you or the fleece. Now, turn on your water to a slow continuous stream, and hold the balloon next to it. You should see the water bend, trying to get to the balloon.

http://lifehacker.com/5851341/how-can-i-avoid-static-shocks-in-the-winter

  • Thanks for the informed and helpful answer, MagnaVis! :-D I hope to see you around LH :-) – Shokhet Feb 13 '15 at 20:33
  • Oops! I asked this question without realizing that it had been asked already. You might want to consider moving your (excellent) answer over there, in case the information therein isn't there yet. – Shokhet Feb 15 '15 at 4:51
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I'd like to add to Magna's answer above by suggesting multiple humidifiers. We live in a two story house with a wood stove. The main living space has two ultrasonics and the bedroom has one. The woodstove, as a source of "free" heat for shoving more water into the air, has its own oldefashoined pot of water on top. That manages to keep two cats and two people from sticking to each other.

  • Oops! I asked this question without realizing that it had been asked already. You might want to consider moving your (excellent) answer over there, in case the information therein isn't there yet. – Shokhet Feb 15 '15 at 4:55

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