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When shoveling snow in the winter, if my gloves are warm enough to keep my hands warm, they tend to sweat and get the gloves wet from the inside out. How can I prevent this?

4

Go with a moisture-wicking pair of liners - they will keep your hands dry and warm while channeling the moisture away. When you get in, turn the outer-layer gloves inside out to dry.

3

Putting on a snug fitting pair of latex or nitrate gloves on first and then putting the winter gloves on is a good solution. You often see nurses or mechanics wearing these types of gloves to keep their hands free of blood or oil. The are not effective for keeping your hands warm, but they are effective as a moisture barrier.

When your hands sweat these gloves keep the moisture inside of the latex/nitrate glove barrier and keep your warm winter gloves dry. You can come back in from an hour of shoveling snow, pull off your still dry winter gloves, than pull off the latex/nitrate gloves and throw them away. Your gloves stay dry and your hands stay warm.

  • I've tried this, and it doesn't work well. Either the nitrile gloves split, they bunch, or they get slimy. So, they either chafe really badly, simply don't keep the moisture in place, or they become filled with sweat that's less than pleasant to the touch. – computercarguy Jan 4 '18 at 16:14
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    @computercarguy I normally get the 7mil nitrate gloves, in a size that is a snug fit. They hold up well. They do get wet (slimy?) inside but I find it much less chafing then going without them. I actually started wearing the nitrate gloves as I found the winter gloves chafe my knuckles, and accidentally discovered that it also keeps my gloves dry. – James Jenkins Sep 2 '18 at 10:02
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I have several pairs of gloves with different thicknesses and styles. They're cheap! Lowes, Ace Hardware, and many stores have an endless variety. I wear the type gloves suited to the temperature and task. The pair I normally use for shoveling snow are thin, elastic, and have rubber pads on the palms.

I prefer my hands to be a little cold, but not uncomfortable. As I work they stay plenty warm. If my hands did begin to sweat I would take the gloves off or go inside and get a lighter pair.

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