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I've had this problem a lot. I cut the tip of my finger on something and it starts to bleed. I try to put a bandaid on, but it just doesn't fit on right. The sides poke out and it just looks and feels uncomfortable. There must be a life hack to avoid this. How can I put a bandaid on the tip of my finger, so that it fits well and wraps around? I know that there are special fingertip bandaids, but I don't have them and don't plan on buying them.

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We can very easily make our special fingertip bandaid from a standard bandaid by using a clean pair of scissors (consider rinsing the scissors in desinfenctant (e.g. alcohol) or heating is shortly with a lighter before use).

Then we can cut out a trapezoid shape at the long sides of the bandaid to leave the pad in the middle, and to obtain lateral plaster flaps that will perfectly hold the baindaid in place.

enter image description here

The size of both the bandaid, and the cuts we make depend on the size of the injured finger. In addition, the way we cut also depends on the make of our standard bandaid. If it was a whole strip with wound pads to the outer sides we have to remove parts of the central wound pad, if the lateral plaster rim was wide enough and the wound bad small, we can just cut the sides of the trapeziod but leave the plaster to additional fix the bandaid.

  • Instead of cutting the while part out I was taught to leave that in so it can protect the wound from the side. Just cut in as described but only the "tilted sides" of the trapezoid, and fold them first when putting the bandaid on, then overlap by the rest of the bandaid. Not nothing but air can get to the wound. – Maverick283 Mar 26 '15 at 8:10
  • @Maverick283: that depends on the make of the standard baindaid we have. If it was a whole band it will have the white parts within the outer rims, if it was a ready-cut bandaid the outer rim may be too small to leave... but in principle you are perfectly right, if the glue parts are broad enough we can just make 4 cuts and leave them in place (edited my answer for this). – Takkat Mar 26 '15 at 8:32
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From Instructables:

Take a bandaid and cut the ends up to the gauze in half.

enter image description here

Then lay the bandaid flat and put the finger on it wrapping the wings around it. Do it to both sides of the bandaid and then it should fit on your finger like a little hat.

enter image description here


Make sure the finger, scissors and bandaid are clean. Use disinfectants and cut the bandaid in the package.

  • I tried this after seeing it on instructables. For me, it works well on knuckles for flexibility, but just falls off fingertips after a short time. – TIO Begs Mar 30 '15 at 14:50
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If you use extra wide bandaids, you stick the bandaid lengthways along the front and back of your finger.

The sides of the bandaid will wrap around the sides of your finger and stick to each other.

  • I do this lengthwise also, but using standard bandaids. I just use two, one lengthwise to cover the tip, then the other around the finger to hold it in place (you could also use tape, etc for that). I guess it could be considered wasteful, but I'm generally not thinking much about that when my child is bleeding and upset about it. – TIO Begs Mar 30 '15 at 14:48
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I wrap the band-aid over the end of the finger and pull the ends diagonally around below. Then I use nail scissors to snip off, in a curve around the shape of the finger, any sharp corners and any flaps sticking out. (If there are gaps then in the gauzy part, you can put another band-aid on horizontally over it, or a bit of bandage-tape.) Plastic band-aids are the worst for the sharpness, but cloth ones are the worst for obtrusive flaps. So I buy band-aids that have the sticky part made out of stretchy foam, or best of all for fingertips, Nexcare Soft 'n' Flex, since it's the thinnest stretchy kind. The combination of the technique with one of these types is much more comfortable than, and at least as secure as, any specialized fingertip-band-aid. So if you can buy new band-aids of a general sort any time, try Nexcare Soft 'n' Flex ones, or foam (a.k.a. 'sport') ones of whatever brand you like.

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