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I am currently trying to make a cylinder out of chipboard(the cardboard that notebooks are typically made out of). However, whenever I try to bend it, parts of the chipboard start to tear. How do I bend chipboard without tearing it apart?

closed as off-topic by Robert Cartaino Jun 29 '15 at 16:08

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Does not seem to need a life hack — A "life hack" is a seemingly intractable problem that can be solved by thinking outside the box. Unfortunately, everyday "How to…" questions about learning a craft or new skill are outside the scope of this site. See about Lifehacks. If the author can show how this needs an "outside the box" solution, edit and 'flag' to reopen." – Robert Cartaino
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  • If there are techniques to bend this type of material, you might ask on our Woodworking SE or DIY site. – Robert Cartaino Jun 29 '15 at 16:10
  • Cannot see why this is off topic. Also the cardboard that note books use as a cover are called chip board in the USA and what is chip board in the UK is particle board in the USA so this is not a woodworking topic, DIY perhaps. Paper and card products are made on a continuous line, they have a 'grain' and trying to bend one way is MUCH harder to get right than in the perpendicular direction, moistening the card stock between two damp blotters for some hours or misting it earlier should also help. – KalleMP Jul 5 '15 at 20:28
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If you mist the cardboard with water and let it get a little damp, you should be able to bend it without it breaking apart. Once you have your cylinder formed, let it dry out. Exact time required and amount of water might be a bit tricky as not all cardboard will behave the same way.

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    Why the downvote? – UnhandledExcepSean Jun 29 '15 at 16:30
  • If i'm not mistaken that's also how they bend wood soo that indeed my be a good solution, although dried cardboard never looks quite the same as before it was wet. – Laurent S. Jun 30 '15 at 7:19
  • A fabric steamer will work well for this. – John Meacham Dec 31 '15 at 17:03

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