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Theoretically, the only problem of water with electricity is with electricity. So, if I wash my motherboard, RAM, CPU and everything else, it should boot fine if I make sure that there are no traces of water, right? Any traces of water could make a short-circuit.

I know I should be careful with:

  • Oil from the ventilation. If it's 'cleaned', won't work anymore.
  • Any too tiny hole that might hold water.
  • Impure water may leave traces of something on the computer parts.

Did I forget anything?

So, how could I do a saturday cleaning in my computer knowing that it will boot tomorow?

closed as off-topic by holroy, CRABOLO, michaelpri Aug 31 '15 at 0:48

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Does not seem to need a life hack — A "life hack" is a seemingly intractable problem that can be solved by thinking outside the box. Unfortunately, everyday "How to…" questions about learning a craft or new skill are outside the scope of this site. See about Lifehacks. If the author can show how this needs an "outside the box" solution, edit and 'flag' to reopen." – holroy, CRABOLO, michaelpri
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    You've probably falsely assumed that if you unplug your computer there is no electricity. Components can store electricity, which introducing water to, could cause short circuits and permanent damage. – James Webster Aug 30 '15 at 14:52
  • Is there a workaround for it? – Rodmentou Aug 30 '15 at 15:19
  • The only one I can think of is to use pure water (it's not the water that conducts electricity, it's the impurities). But this certainly doesn't come out of your garden hose. Even then I'd probably not trust the water to be pure enough to try it. – James Webster Aug 30 '15 at 15:21
  • Welcome to Lifehacks SE. This question has been closed because this does not need a life hack as defined in the help center. As commented above, it is also not very safe for your computer to clean it wih a garden hose. – michaelpri Aug 31 '15 at 0:50
  • Your hypothesis ("the only problem is with electricity") is incorrect - you have forgotten one pretty important thing: corrosion. Tiny metal parts will corrode quickly when exposed to water. Granted, not every part will degrade (some metals are less prone to corrosion than others), but enough of the system will to transform your computer into a very expensive doorstop. – Piskvor Aug 31 '15 at 10:15
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Generally, blowing dust out of a computer is enough to keep it satisfactorily clean. If you spill something that needs liquid to remove, use isopropyl alcohol. Apply with a cotton swab gently until clean. The do it again to get trace residue off. Leave it for two minutes, more than enough time for a small amount to evaporate, before turning the system on.

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