Hot answers tagged

56

Take a bucket full of water (the bigger the diameter is, the better) and push your inflated inner tube into the water - section for section. As long as the hole isn't like really, really tiny, you will see some bubbles right away. With tiny holes you need some steady hands, more time and a good pair of eyes. Small bubbles are hard to spot. For easiest ...


49

Use soapy water if you don't have where to submerge the tire: Take soap and some water and make soapy water solution (liquid soap dissolves faster) Start to apply soapy water on the tire with your hand When you put soapy water on the hole you will see soap bubbles appearing. At the same time you can feel the air flow with your hand. Wet hand becomes more ...


21

You may need to use water, as others have said, but before you do that.... Get the tube and partially inflate it Hold the tube to your ear and slowly rotate it When you hear the air hissing out, you have found the hole. Not only is this quicker than water, it also works out on the road (as there never seems to be a bucket of water around when you need it).


12

Tires deflating within a couple of days have a leak. If you don't ride your bike for a couple of weeks you may see some deflation but quicker than that you need to look for a leak in your tires. Remove the inner tube and spray it with soap water. Pump up the tube a little, not a lot since you don't want to burst it, and check for bubbles. Repair any holes ...


9

At most bike shops here they sell this: It is like a box with small very light balls in them. Just move it along the tire and the balls will start to jump at the hole


8

The quickest overall method is this: Pull the tube from the tire and pump it up well above the volume it would be inside the tire. Then (in a quiet place) rotate the tube past your ear. You will almost certainly be able to find the general location of the leak by hearing the hiss, then explore more closely with your finger, keeping your ear close to the ...


8

When I mend a puncture or do maintenance work on the chain, I just put my bike upside down. I do have a rather broad saddle; a racing bike might be a bit too unstable to stand still on its own. Still, you should have some other (moderately heavy) items lying around to stabilize the bike, e.g. by preventing the frame to move to either side.


6

You could try using "pogies". These are sleeves that are attached to your handlebars, allowing you to slip your hands in and out easily. Pogies allow you to go barehanded when you would normally need gloves and to wear light gloves when you would normally need heavy mitts.


6

Can you use a "spare" lock to attach your bike to theirs with a telephone # or other contact information? With your lock securing both bikes to the bike rack, you have a much better chance to meet the person to exchange "favours" when they're ready to leave with their bike. It's not convenient; but, there's a chance you'll get back the bike and the lock, ...


5

Many flash sticks / pen drives nowadays have keyring loops. I simply carry a flash stick on my keyring - like this... As my keys are always in my pocket if I'm outside the house, the flash stick is always with me. Everybody has a pocket in which they keep keys in a comfortable manner.


4

Use the local vegetation around you to replace the chain. A twig can be used as a lever, leaves-a cloth... If you have no vegetation and are in downtown, small wood scraps, old "litter", and even strong paperclips can be used!


4

When I studied at the university some years ago (read: a lot of years ago), there were occasionally raids of bikes being stolen. It soon turned out to be two different kind of thieves: Professionals stealing quality bikes Amateurs needing a bike to get downtown The first kind of thieves are not easy to stop from stealing your bike, whilst the other group ...


4

Call the police....explain the situation and maybe you could break the other lock together (without looking like a bike thief). I'm sure that locking another one's bike is illegal. Then you may want to put another lock to his bike or the police could take his bike leaving contact information at the site. The police should have the old lock so that the '...


4

There's a small chance this is malicious - is the other bike nice or a cheap junker? Don't take your lock off and leave it with only their lock attached, else the bike could be stolen by other-bike-owner, or any miscreant that wanders through. Though most likely Hanlon's razor applies: never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by ...


4

Can't make a STAND? … Make a HANG. (Forgive me. I can't help myself) IF (big if) you have conveniently located doors, shelf units, or even a couple of hi-back chairs, you might be able to use these to support something stretched between them. In a perfect world, you would tightly attach the bike top-tube to a pole, pipe, or 2X4 timber that would extend ...


3

It's probably an unfortunate mistake. You can either wait until the other owner arrives or your bike will be spending the night there. It probably isn't worth the time an effort to try to break the lock.


3

What if you speak to a neighbour and politely ask them if you could store your bike in their garage or their yard. Maybe you could offer them something in exchange.


3

One of the tricks I've heard of is filling the inner tube with air and submerging it in water. If you're having trouble finding the leak, then the air isn't escaping too quickly for you to be able to detect it underwater.


3

Not sure what indexed shifters are, but assuming it was your front gear (the one with the pedals), here's a method that works for me: While riding, as soon as you realize the chain came off, stop pedaling. Stop riding and dismount. Shift the gears of the bike all the way opposite of the side the chain fell off. So if the chain fell to the right, you want ...


3

In the absence of a bucket with soapy water (eg. on the go), I usually use my tongue. If you don't mind the taste of the rubber, it works even better than using your lips. The saliva on your tongue will create a seal against the hole and gently squeezing air out of the tube will 'burp' or 'fart' against your tongue. This is very helpful with tiny holes ...


3

Since you mentioned riding a bicycle or motorcycle, might I suggest this solution: Search: Running belt This is a lean running waistpack — essentially it's a long, zippered neoprene pouch which wraps around you beltline to be worn over or under your shirt when you have small items which are easily lost when you are active. It's very ...


3

A retractable badge holder would probably do the trick. You could wear it on your belt, and instead of attaching a badge, you could attach your USB drive. Note that the cord attached to it can easily extend and retract.


2

When a tire deflates, it is because the air is escaping. Since air pressure in the tire is much higher than atmospheric (2 - 8 bar vs 1 bar for atmospheric) it is unlikely that changes in the weather / barometric pressure play a role. Similarly, temperature can play a minor role, but it would be on the order of a few % at most (pressure being lower on a ...


2

If you don’t use bicycle for a "couple of days", then you will have to refill it. Try hanging your bicycle and try nitrogen filling instead of air. Nitrogen is supposed to last longer than air (should be available in petrol pumps)


2

The loss of air pressure is due to the ambient pressure being lower than the pressure in the tires, and a path for with air can pass from inside the tube to outside the tube (commonly called a leak). There really are only two solutions: Store the bicycle (or just the wheels) in a hyperbaric chamber. You could theoretically even inflate the tires this way, ...


2

Pump up your tires! In my experience, even when in a hurry, the extra time spent on getting the tires up to maximum pressure usually pays off.


2

Well, I live in NYC. Here are some tips that I use and/or have seen around town: Don't leave it in a busy area, no matter how good your locks are I use Pinhead locks for the wheels and seat I use a German made U-lock (ABUS) Take off the wheel or seat and carry it with you Make your bike uglier, so it's less attractive Be careful to not leave your bike ...


2

It sounds like you didn't actually lock the bike to anything. This is not very secure at all a thief could just walk the bike away, lifting it up a little so that they were carrying it but it would still be subtle and passerby's wouldn't notice anything. Alternatively they could just load the bike into their car, again passerby's wouldn't notice anything. ...


2

If the other bike is only chained to your bike and nor the bike rack, unchain your bike and take the whole lot home. Possibly leave a note for the other bike owner, but I'd be inclined to let them suck eggs! Once you have the bikes at home, use whatever tools you need to unchain the second bike (grinder, hacksaw etc.) and then hand it in to the local police ...


2

You could try leaving salt or some other absorbent grainy material in contact with it. This would ideally absorb the oil. As the jacket is waxed, the oil shouldn't be penetrating the material at all so it should just 'wipe off'.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible