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In the Army, even though we were a medical unit made up of mostly medics, but also a few nurses, a dental asst, a few clerks, and an X-ray Tech/Medic (aka, me), we had to go to the Motor Pool every week to do preventive maintenance (e.g., check the fluids, look for leaks, throughly clean) by inspecting in, under, around, and on top of our Humvees, ambulances,...


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I'd take toilet paper (that sucks up liquids well), roll it up, then heat up the jack with a blow-drier and then let the toilet paper suck the liquid out. You'll of course need to take care not to cause more damage then you already have by: overheating the phone with the blow-drier leaving toilet paper in the jack, that you can't get out


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I cover mine with foil on top, then throw it away like monthly.


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You can make water base solution using tea tree oil. Great for disinfection! spray on it leave it on and then wipe it off. I believe for home use equipment that's enough.


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What is the sponge wrapped around? If it wrapped around metal or plastic, then washing can be an easy step. If it is wrapped around wood, then you should avoid moisture as much as possible. Eventually, if the grip is removable, you might want to wrap the wood with some plastic foil, for protection. Wet disinfection: water and soap, rinse after; any ...


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I have found that using a nylon cleaning brush “magically” repels the peanut butter off of anything. When the jar is mostly empty, I turn on the faucet and start scrubbing away inside the jar and viola!, the peanut butter clumps in my sink strainer (which I toss in the garbage). It works really quickly!


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I doubt you'd experience a significantly increased fire risk with greasy paper over greasy dust, especially if you're careful not to leave paper sticking up - igniting paper that stops a few mm short of the face of the cupboard and is taped down, using only a burning pan, will prove difficult. If the flames from a burning pan have reached the top of the ...


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I'd suggest getting a range hood to prevent most of the grease from getting to the top of your cabinets. This can be vented outside or even recirculated, but the hood should have a grease trap air filter to prevent most of the grease from accumulating where you don't want it. Most of the time, these filters are washable or at least replaceable. Some over ...


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I know this is an old Question, but several of the answer aren't good solutions. Bleach can destroy the insulation. Isopropyl alcohol won't kill the mold. Baking soda may kill the mold as a dry powder, but will still have to be washed off or you'll leave a trail of white dust behind. Even after it's washed off, it might still leave a white residue. The ...


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I know this is an old Question, but WD-40 works well to remove the glue. Just a few drops, a little gentle scrubbing, and it should dissolve. Then a quick wipe down or wash with dish soap on the affected area, and it should be good as new.


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While I was researching the solution provided by @computercarguy I came across a product that works even better: Oxy Power Shot - This stain had been set in for months and it took it right up like it wasn't even there. Here's what I did. Soak the stain for 5 minutes Scrub vigorously with a paper towel. Ran the robot vacuum over the spot repeatedly in Strong ...


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I'd suggest a fabric shaver (aka: clothes defuzzer). It's designed to remove lint and fuzz from clothes without damaging the fabric. It'll likely remove the slightly larger fibers as well. Doing a quick online search, there seems to be a wide variety of them as well as a wide variety of retailers having them available. Random image from the internet for ...


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I found a couple articles doing a basic Search, but this one seems to be the easiest to read as well as incorporates the other ideas. Disclosure: I have not tried this myself and I have no affiliation with the site linked below. Carpet What you will need Dry Cleaning solvent Detergent White vinegar Steps to Clean ...


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I'm sorry to say I don't think there's a hack solution for this. Unfortunately, you washed it without removing the down debris first, because it's likely a sticky roller would have got most of it off prior to washing. Now, though, it looks as though the bits of down have worked their way into the weave of the fabric during the wash - were this mine, and ...


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Use a normal comb. They might want to go off. Carefully use a safety razor. It works for other clothes problems, you might get lucky. Use a depilator (if you have one). The fluff might actually come from inside the jacket. In this case, you might have to actually deal with it one-by-one. Use some (strong?) adhesive tape. Works similar with the sticky lint ...


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Seems to me like most any fabric wont let go of things like this if you wash it. I can't comment, so I'll ask here instead. Does you vacuum have a rug or preferably curtain setting? It will help suction and not create a vacuum. A nail brush or similar brushes might do the trick. I haven't tried this on down, but my next suggestion works on animal hair ...


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Vacuum it regularly. If your vacuum has various settings, set it to cloth/curtains/rugs (whatever yours says) to not create a vacuum. (I know, ironic isn't it?) This will help prevent some stains from setting. Before you clean it, I'd suggest testing in a place that's not visible to see if its color will come off or not. Underside of the seat, perhaps? Use ...


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Lay the jacket flat. Unreel a length of sticky tape (standard clear tape, not any kind of heavy duty or overly sticky tape that will leave glue on the jacket). Holding one end in each hand, dab the sticky side of tape across the jacket. It will pick up the lint. Repeat with a fresh length of sticky tape as necessary.


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