Hot answers tagged

55

Buy drinks with sugar in a non-can format. If there's a bunch of cans, plus 2 plastic bottles, that's easily distinguishable. What this avoids is having to try each can in turn to see if it has a rubber band or string or whatever. The instant you grab something, it's obvious if it's a can or bottle, which is important when you're having a medical emergency, ...


41

Always keep one bottle of water in the refrigerator (or freezer if you prefer a block of ice that will thaw throughout the day). When it's time to go somewhere, swap your room temperature bottle for the cold one. Before you argue that it doesn't answer the question, remember this is LifeHacks SE not Physics SE. This takes less than 10 minutes, doesn't ...


35

Submerge the bottle in a bucket of ice water [1]Fill a bucket with ice water and add a pinch of salt, which helps the water absorb the heat energy from the can or bottle. Wrap your bottle in a wet paper towel and put it in the freezer [2]The wet paper towel outside the bottle will utilize physics to help transfer heat energy outside the bottle more quickly.


29

Just a simple thought: you could use a little piece of string tied to the hole in the tab to mark the odd ones out (that's less work than marking 90% of the cans). Like this (it's Friday afternoon, so I have no soda can available):


23

If you need to rapidly cool beverages that are still sealed in cans or bottles, put them in a mixture of water, ice, and salt. Once the beverages are submerged in the mixture you can stir them to have them cool even faster. The salt melts the ice faster cooling the water more quickly. This only takes a few minutes to cool you beverage. I've heard this from ...


20

Thread a Straw Through the Tab on a Soda Can to Keep It from Rising It's as simple as turning the tab to the side and sliding the straw through it. This keeps the straw from rising up and falling out of the can. Take some tape, wrap it around the straw and tape it to the jar. This will stop rising and the straw is in a fixed place. Also, try ...


17

There are many, many options for bottle cap removal. As mentioned but not really explained there's the lighter trick: The key to this method is having a tight grip on the neck of the bottle so that your hand/fulcrum doesn't move when you apply force with the lighter/lever. You can apply this method with most anything you have lying around: keys, spoons, ...


17

This is exactly what a baby formula dispenser is for. They normally have three separated compartments with a top that you can rotate to easily empty the contents of a single compartment.


16

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) for an insulin dependent diabetes is a medical emergency, consuming sugar is a matter of life and death. The cans containing sugar should be marked, if the marking comes off, accidentally consuming a sugar beverage instead of diet, is much less life threatening Place a rubber band around the center of the sugar soda cans. ...


15

I tried to create a similar filter device with a paper towel and it worked perfectly. Here is what I did: First, make sure you have paper towels... seems foolish to mention, but hey... its true! Approximate the size of your basket with your hand and tear a circle out of the paper towel bout an inch (+/- 2cm) wider than the basket size. Place the paper into ...


15

As well as paper towels as Phlume has mentioned, there are also a couple of other materials that can be used in place of a coffee filter: Cloth You can use a clean handkerchief or cut a square of cloth from a clean tea-towel and push down into your filter basket - cut away any excess and place the grounds into the 'filter' and continue as you were. Sock or ...


14

Because drinking straws are not 100% smooth, they are perfect nucleation sites for bubbles to attach to. (Source) Here's what you can do: Take it out and lick it off Use ice cubes in your drink to prevent the straw from rising as quickly Use a bigger straw that can't be lifted by a few bubbles of CO2


14

You can use an actual can opener to open your can. Either place the flat rectangular end of the can opener against the normal opening of the can and pry it open, or place the pointy end of the can opener against another part of the lid and pry a new hole in the lid to drink out of.


14

There are many good answers here. I'd use that old lifehacks fallback: duct tape. Just wrap a band of duct tape around the middle of every soda that includes sugar. It will be an easy, tactile way to identify cans containing sugar.


13

Methods I use with quotes from WikiHow: Pour the contents from cup to cup. This may take sometimes. Chilling the mug beforehand works wonders. Take your drink and pour it from one cup to the other cup. If your cup goes higher, then more air will go through it, making it colder. Don't make your cup go too high, after pouring, it might bounce a few ...


11

Make coffee ice cubes and keep in the freezer, that way you won't dilute your coffee when putting them in. If you have your coffee in a mug with a sealable lid then shake it, once the cubes are in, for even cooler coffee. Alternative: you could choose to drink ice coffee. Answers on other Stack Exchange sites: https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/...


11

The keyword is dissipation. What you want is a large amount of liquid on the right temperature. The larger the amount, the better (a large amount of liquid heats up less quickly because there's more to heat up. If it heats up too much, it isn't cooling much.). The relative heat of the cans will be dissipated by the liquid. It's important the cans are ...


11

In a shaken up soda can, the carbon dioxide bubbles form on the sides of the can, not the top. That is why tapping the top is not very effective. A better method is to hit the sides of the can repeatedly. This will knock down the carbon dioxide bubbles. When you open it, it shouldn't explode. If it does, out your finger in the foam flow. This helps the foam ...


11

Blow across the top of the bottle like a jug in a jug band. If the noise is high, the bottle is full. If the noise is low, the bottle is empty. In between, the bottle is in between. Over time, when you listen to the various sounds your bottle makes, you can get a feel for how full it is. Perhaps save a completely empty bottle to compare the sound that ...


11

If you keep the bottle in the refrigerator like my wife does, when you take it out the condensation on the side of the bottle will tell you the level exactly within a few minutes. In a rush? Breathe on the bottle.


10

I admit I haven't opened a lot of soda cans, but this technique hasn't failed me yet: Lift the tab very slowly and with a firm grip, and stop when you hear a hissing sound start. (There should not be any visible opening at all.) Wait for the hiss to stop. (There may be some soda bubbling out of the top but it won't spray or be enough to spill over.) It's ...


10

The trick is to sort of isolate your arm and shoulder from the rest of your body when you're moving, so that your body's moving but the combined unit of your arm, shoulder, and hand carrying the drink isn't. The only way I can achieve this is to fix my attention on what I'm carrying rather than looking at the floor or stairs as I walk, but it's much more ...


9

Fill a bottle about half full and lay it on its side in the freezer with the neck tipped up just enough so that the water doesn't block it. Just before you leave take it out of the freezer and fill with water from the tap. While you're out the ice melts and cools the water. You could rotate bottles through the freezer so there's always one ready :)


9

Cup socks Now here's not the best solution in terms of heat preservation but it's a hack. What keeps our feet warm in winter can't be too bad for a cup of coffee: Wrapping a thick winter men's sock around a cup is not too hard as long as it is not yet filled. For optimum insulation we can get 2 or 3 layers of warm wool by putting the cup base down into a ...


9

It helps a lot if you hold the drink loosely, in the tips of your fingers so there won't be a lot of shock when walking, making the drink spill less. I know this from my own experience, as a waitress.


9

If it's big enough for your servings, use Kinder Surprise eggs. These are things you usually throw away but can use for storing various things. Further, I think click-clack mint boxes could work as well. Basically any small container you already have laying around, which is more or less air tight, could work. I have no experience with powders but if ...


9

Indian takeaway restaurants provide chutneys in small sealable plastic containers, about 3cm in diameter. I collect these after a curry and they make perfect containers for individual doses of soluble drinks.


9

My favorite solution is actually no tool - having observed the surge of drinks that get served with a straw, I still remember when it was perfectly acceptable to drink either out of a glass, cup or from the bottle (if you need instructions, ask your friendly beer-drinker). A straw was a fancy extra for special occasions. In many cases, a straw is more of a ...


8

Microwave is your best bet. If it exploded last time, it might have been the container. First, get a new container and test that it's microwave safe. Add your milk and a few coffee grounds to create a non-uniform volume so it won't get superheated. Nuke until boiling.If you don't want to go the microwave route, I can think of an alternative but it takes a ...


8

How about cling-wrap? You could cover any bowl, container, cup, etc. over the top, and it would become a makeshift lid. I realize it is something else to have in your desk, and it costs money, but if all else fails it might just be the best solution :) Good luck!


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