4

First clean the area with rubbing alcohol. Then cut small squares from a bandaid. Use the cloth-type bandaid. Place a few layers if needed, and press each one firmly into place.


3

Your grandparents can relax their relentless search for a specific storage case. HACK: Find a zip-lock plastic bag big enough to hold your grandparents' goggles. This will be sufficient to protect the eyewear from all but a direct meteor strike. They are clean and dust resistant so long as the seal remains closed. They won't scratch the goggles lens. You can ...


3

Use your favorite search engine and look for monitor screen privacy filter or similar. They are plastic sheets which you apply to the monitor (easily removable and re-appliable countless times) and they do exactly what you want. The person in front of the computer sees the proper image on the screens, everyone else will see black screens. Even a person ...


3

Use the polarizing filter of the monitor itself. I suggest trying the following with an old laptop or LCD monitor first. After dismantling, remove the outer layer from the monitor. Now the monitor is completely blank, and whatever is displayed invisible to the naked eye. Find, make, or buy a frame for glasses, cut the shapes of the glasses out of the ...


3

The question appears to be But what if the manufacturer's case can fit only the eyeglass itself, and is too small to fit eyeglass with bubble wrap? If the bubblewrap is too thick, then use something thinner to protect the glasses. They are usually supplied with a small soft cloth inside the case. Wrap the glasses with that, and/or a larger piece of soft ...


2

I'd get a plastic bag and cut a small piece off it. Apply a small blob of silicone sealant to the bag (about the side of an eyeglasses nose pad, then pick it up and carefully apply it to the glasses (perhaps hold them in a vise, or stick them into something, like a potato, so that they don't roll around and are fixed in such a position that the bag/silicone ...


2

You have already taken every reasonable precaution to ship the eyeglasses safely and securely. Where there is some space you wish to fill, small pieces of loosely-crumpled paper can be used to absorb shock. The crumpled paper isn't messy as styrofoam plastic peanut dust or lint from cloth. Good luck.


1

If it's about protecting the goggles from scratches, your grandma can knit a fluffy drawstring bag for them. I suggest using either thick yarn or a very thick pattern like patent or cabe knit. This is a good way to use some leftover yarn and it adds a lovely personal touch to this otherwise grim situation. I've kept my phone in a drawstring bag knit from ...


1

Instead of buying a dedicated glasses case for the goggles, you/they can buy any box which is big enough and not overly big. I would start looking at the freezer and lunch box section of the shops. Such a box is likely to be overly big, fill the extra space with kitchen paper or a piece of cloth which can be replaced at each use or which can be cleaned. If ...


1

If the broken edges fit very well together, I would use cyanoacrylate (super glue) to mate them. Since CA sticks poorly to polyolefins and acetal, you may want to make sure your glasses are the right material by gluing something small like a piece of wood to a spot near the back and seeing how much effort it takes to break it off. This test will also help ...


1

I had the same problem with my thin wire frames. I tighten the screws but the lens still popped out, one easier than the other. I removed the screws and lenses and went to my garage and used a medal file to try and file off a little of the thickness of the female side of the lens that received the screw. My hand file didn't seem to be doing much so I pulled ...


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