Hot answers tagged

10

Sellotape: Stick sellotape against the pilled fabric and peel it off. Combing: Use fine distant comb to remove the pills. Razor: Use ready made razor and remove the pills just like shaving.


10

If you are acne-prone, you should change washcloths and towels very frequently, possibly every day, not just when you feel they are getting "dirty". My personal "hack" for a similar situation1 was to invest in a whole load of small washcloths/towels (Ikea has packs of ten for 3€ / £3 / $4 and they can be washed very hot and dumped into the drier, for ...


7

These problems are actually connected. The first problem is that the cotton used is very likely short staple, so as not to say cheap, low weight, low quality cotton. That represents a systemic problem limiting the effectiveness of the following suggestions. On the other hand the effects you see might also be called "a feature", since they are comfortable ...


5

You can get a length of clear packing tape about 8-10" long and, holding the ends, press it against the lampshade and draw it back off. It will have picked up the dust in that area. Then press it on another spot. Repeat this process until the lampshade is clean. Unless it's very dusty, the tape usually lasts a good 2-3 shades for me. Once it is no longer ...


4

Things that can be of use: This article calls it "Hook and Fastener", but I think that it is better known as velcro. Pull the fastener straight off the fabric--it should bring most of the pilling with it. The small hooks of the fastener strip can damage very delicate fabrics, so use this method sparingly. This can promote fuzzing. From experience a ...


4

Usual method to remove wax is to try to pick or peel off as much as possible, and then get some blotting paper or a couple of sheets of absorbent kitchen paper and a hot iron. Place the paper over the wax, and apply the hot iron to the paper - the trouble is, your jumper is wool, and that doesn't take too much of a high temperature, so its a bit of a risk. ...


4

Use any suitable cloth as a backing (used under the surface) for the jeans. A small square of any stiff fabric would be useable. A hack would be to use an Iron-on patch inside your jeans. If you don't want to do that, you can find fabric glue. After the hole is plugged, hand sew the bottom of the loop back on to cover the "hole" the same as the rest of the ...


3

Place the garment in the freezer for an hour or two, remove and break the wax off the garment. I would go this route first before trying to heat the wax. Heating the wax seems like it would make it get into the fabric deeper, making it harder to remove.


3

The tiny piece you're holding in the picture is not a piece of fabric, it's (for lack of a better word) a "braid" of threads that extends from the seam. This is a very common thing in cheap fast-fashion garments because the underpaid workers don't care (and aren't paid) to finish their seams properly. If you cut it too close to the actual garment, ...


3

The rubberized printing responds well to several applications of felt marker. In your case, choose a permanent marker in dark blue. Use a hatching stroke at 45 degree angle to completely cover the printing. If the marker touches the base fabric, it will not be too noticeable. Repeat this the next day or two. The colour does a good job of camouflaging the ...


3

Very clean cotton (dust in the fabric can scratch, which is why you aren't supposed to use the t-shirt you are wearing to clean your glasses). Microfiber is what everyone recommends, but I doubt you have any clothes made of that. Be careful with synthetic fabric, as I have heard a number of times that some types can scratch glasses (although never any ...


3

Similar to your suggestion of tape, but probably easier and quicker is to use a lint roller like this: A lint roller has a roll of masking tape on it, and is usually used to remove lint from clothes. But you could also use it to remove dust from lampshades. Just roll it on the lampshade and it will pick up the dust. Then after the tape loses its ...


2

Lampshades are very difficult to dust. They contain nooks and crannies which make it impossible to really get in there and clean them thoroughly. They are also fragile, so you can't wash them off using water, detergents, etc. Most vacuum cleaners would also damage them unless you have a soft brush attachment. One of the best ways to dust them is to use a ...


2

The brush-end of a vacuum's upholstery cleaning attachment works great. Attach it to the hose (and extension, if necessary) then starting at the top of the shade, use straight, gentle stroke all the way to the bottom rim. Turn the shade a tiny amount -- or move your body around it -- then repeat in slightly overlapping swaths until you've completed the ...


2

You won't likely stop them biting through unless the fabric is quite thick, and then it might not be as breathable for your needs. You need to make sure there is enough space between you and the mosquito net (including where it hits the hammock). Either tie it up better, or add more strings to pull it away from you. Or, depending on your setup, add an ...


2

Assuming that you didn't go to the bathroom naked, you will have your worn clothes with you. Unless they are really dirty from sweat, dust or other outdoor dirt, they will, in a pinch, be a suitable towel stand-in. If you wear layers, e.g. a sweater over a t-shirt, the inside of the sweater and the outside of the t-shirt will be basically clean because they ...


2

First of all: 400 thread cottons that are "scratchy" should be returned. Second: Maneesh's answer is way better than the current votes reflect. Vinegar is the most effective and safe for most cotton fabrics, most colours, the washing machine and the environment. (It also helps to protect the washer from built-up residue.) That said, this is mainly to be ...


2

I suggest you the following methods: Wash with Baking Soda and Vinegar in a washing machine(as you have not specified about vinegar, I feel you should try this combination: washing soda and vinegar). More methods are as follows: Add a cup of vinegar during the rinse cycle of washing machine. Use turpentine: Add half a cup of turpentine to the washing water ...


2

I've often used lighter fluid to remove ink from carpets. Try a small amount in a discrete area to be sure it doesn't damage the jeans. But it works well on ink. WARNING - Keep away from flames until washed.


1

The two methods by Elmy work. As someone who has sewn all her life, I would use a third method. I would undo that sticking out 'braid' and stop its unraveling just before it reaches the fabric and use its own thread to fix it from unraveling further and coming undone. Mostly you only have to catch one loop of the 'braid', sew through that and the fabric, and ...


1

Take them to a tailor and have them professionally repaired. Many dry cleaning establishments have a tailor on staff. Sometimes a lifehack is not the best or even the cheapest solution.


1

I'd use the same pen to mark another scrap of cloth of the same material blend as your jeans, or mark the jeans somewhere out of sight in normal wear and: try ordinary household bleach, dip something suitable for applying it directly to the stain, wait a few minutes then wash off with water try an oxygen based bleach, possibly sold as a stain remover that ...


1

You said that you have already run the jeans thru your washing machine... but did you put them in the dryer? It is likely a lost cause if you did as it would have set the stain. BUT! On the chance that you didn't do that there are a few suggestions to try on Hunker.com One such suggestion reads: To remove gel ink, pen manufacturer Uni-Ball recommends ...


1

If your scarf is not yet protected, you can make a very fine stitching on the edge of the fabric. This can be done on a machine or by hand. A narrow zigzag stitch over the outer two threads of the fabric will work but be careful than the fringe does not get trapped in the machine. Working by hand you can make a series of stitches over those last two ...


1

The colour is being abraded away in the washing machine. It's gone permanently, I'm afraid. The only thing that will get the colour back is to dye your jeans back to the original colour. Otherwise, declare it to be a feature, not a bug. In future, always wash jeans and chinos inside out. Or you could wash them in laundry net bags, like those used to keep ...


1

In the heat you need to sweat. A lot. Or you overheat. That sweat needs to evaporate to cool you. Completely waterproofing a shirt blocks that water transport. Making you sweat even more because there is no cooling. Your plan will lead into a quite viciously backfiring circle. White is actually one of the better choices to keep the optical effect minimal. ...


1

There are many commercial products to "waterproof" cotton, such as Nikwax Cotton Proof, Scotchgard and Kiwi Camp Dry, my personal experience has been that these treatments are temporary (often removed by the first wash) and not too effective (direct contact with a wet object or impact of raindrops penetrates the garment). That said, one of these products ...


1

You said the bathroom is near the busiest part of your house, then you can call someone and tell him/her to give you a towel. Or if you insist on not using a towel then ask for something else - t-shirt or other clothes. Or if you have taken clothes with you in the bathroom (clean or old) use them to dry your skin and after that you can change them with ...


1

First, watch this TED video (3:41). Then start shaking off your hands and other limbs (note: jumping jacks might not be a great idea if the surface is slippery), and then brush off the water from your skin (e.g. arms, shoulders, everything smooth) as if you were brushing off a bug or a few crumbs, but it's brushing off the water droplets instead. The size ...


1

Get a stiff brush with lots of plastic bristles, one that has a corner so you can get into corners easier. Small section at a time brush in a circular motion, not rough as it will pull the fibers and make it look webby, try to break the dirt loose. Then with a vacuum go over the area brushed to see if it removed the dirt. More than likely you will need to ...


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