Hot answers tagged

113

A common solution I have seen is to have a tennis ball (or similarly soft item) that can be hung from the ceiling. (You may be able to purchase a kit made for this purpose.) With the assistance of another person, drive your vehicle into the garage to a place where you have clearance on both sides. Fasten a string to both the ceiling and your tennis ball. ...


54

Install pool noodles to your wall. Or use pipe insulation.


48

Some trucks and buses have a mirror to eliminate the front blind spot. Reverse the principle - attach any old mirror to the wall/ceiling. Might need a bit of trial and error (and a tall friend) to get the best position.


38

Ask your passenger to get out of the car before you park the car. This also leaves you free to park it right next to the wall. For the passenger, this has the advantage they can open the door to its stop and easily get out of the car.


37

You can purchase/make a parking stopper for your car. If you are going to make one, get an old piece of carpet and short piece of wood at least 1 inch in diameter. The carpet needs to be long enough that when folded, it will fit under the tire. Loop the carpet around the stick with the excess carpet toward the garage door. The weight of the vehicle will ...


26

This, put into the floor or block of wood. Drive up to it, just till you tap it. Then stop. Resist the urge to back up. Edit - I changed from a driveway marker image to my 'in the wild' image from my garage. I made 2 of these, and have used both for 10+ years. It's positioned to both protect the steps from getting smashed and to allow enough clearance to ...


25

My answer assumes, that you already tried simply talking to them and it did not work and also, that you DO want them to exit the vehicle at exact this place. Since this is Lifehacks, not "How can I train my passengers to behave like I want", I would recommend taking steps that, even in the case of them smashing the door against the wall, the damage will be ...


20

Another option, if you find it hard to build a movable stick, fasten the parking stopper, or don't trust the tennis ball, is to make a bumper or fender on the wall. I.e. one made out of foam padding or porolon. As my father worked with upholstery, we had rolls of porolon, which sometimes where stored in the garage. Parking was never easier than when those ...


18

I like marking the wall with something (e.g. permanent marker) to line up with the mirrors. Just park the car carefully, then mark on the wall where your wing mirror is, then in future just drive forward until your mirror lines up with the mark. Simple and cost-effective... No need to purchase anything or hang things from the ceiling.


15

Try attaching a (preferably soft) door mat to your garage wall. My granddad used this method and this works very well because you have a large surface where the door can bump into. If you use screws instead of tape or glue, ensure you cover the screws.


12

The solution lies in almost crashing into the wall without damaging the car. This can be achieved by mounting a light movable stick to the wall, or very close to the wall. Attach something visible to the top, so that you easily identity when you hit the pole, but before you crash into the wall. The pole or stick could be mounted at 2 or 3 inches from the ...


9

There is a couple tried and true methods used of varying difficult from living in AK and ND. 1) Install a storm door. This will provide other additional benefits as well. Should have no frozen up key lock issues after that. $80 to hundreds of dollars, much easy to install yourself than a framed door. 2) Go to a keyless lock. $60 to hundreds. Just keep in ...


7

My mum had this problem and she found some spare pieces of thick wool carpet that were left over from when they refurbished and folded them over so they were double thickness and then stapled them to the wall . So the car door always had a soft landing - it worked well, no more scratches and dents! I'm sure most flooring places will sell you some very cheap ...


6

Park your car driving into the garage backwards. Use both your side mirrors to align the car with the garage. Use the co-driver's side mirror for side to side navigation. Make a mark on the wall that aligns to the mirror when parked in deep enough. With a bit of training you can keep your eyes on the co-driver's side mirror the whole time while parking. You ...


6

You can use cat litter as this works really well. Cat litter works good for cleaning oil spills, but also for cleaning many spots, especially greasy ones. Pour a small amount onto the spot and rub into the spot, pulverizing with your shoe. Sweep up when finished and maybe do it a second time. If it's a greasy spot, pour fresh oil onto the spot first to ...


5

Spray some WD-40 in the keyhole and insert/remove the key a few times. Never had an issue after doing that. If you're looking for extra protection against rain/show/ice, use duct tape to cover the keyhole. Anything that keeps rain/snow/ice from entering the opening will be a plus.


5

Discard it as is. Roll it up and secure it with some string or tape. Don't bother to put it into another piece of plastic (the bag) which adds to the plastic pollution of the planet. Alternately, run a sharp knife down each of the rows of bubbles. Even cutting every-other row will decrease the volume significantly. Is there a UPS store or FedEx outlet ...


4

While not a quick fix, using muriatic acid to wash the concrete floor will get a lot of the surface stains. You may have to use it multiple times to get a really deep stain out. Then there are issues around handling an acid (safety, disposal, etc.). Also, if the surface of the concrete has been sealed, you will have to remove the seal before any cleaning ...


4

There's multiple things you can do to prevent hitting the wall. Install a closet mirror on one side of the wall. That way you can see how close you are to the front wall. Install a guided laser beam and pick a spot on the windshield. Some kits have two lasers, for two car garages. I find these to be a lot of work to setup (mounting, power, alignment, etc). ...


4

I have such a garage and the visible marker technique mentioned by many here works for me. There is a electrical socket on the side of the garage. I make sure the electrical socket lines up with the end of the front passenger door of my minivan. This gives me about 3 inches every time. Just make sure you don't lean too much forward in your seat when you ...


4

Get a few tall traffic codes - the kinds that are tall enough to see from a car window, and tip over easily. Set them just inside the garage door frame on either side. When any of the drivers are coming into the garage, if a cone tips over, they'll need to back up and try again. You could do a similar thing by hanging baseballs or something similar just ...


4

Instead of wafting through a solid wall, the smoke is probably coming through some crack/seam/open area where the air can flow between two garages. Maybe locate and seal those with canned foam.


4

Can you annoy stray cats enough to leave [avoid] your garage using noise ? Humans and cats have a similar range of hearing on the low end of the scale, but cats can hear much higher-pitched sounds, up to 64 kHz, which is nearly two octaves above the range of a human, and even 1 octave above the range of a dog. Maybe a high-pitch "noise" oscillator can be ...


4

You might try this instead. My solution was to STOP carrying the garage door opener. I keep it in my car instead. Also, I installed an external keypad to open the garage when I return from a bike ride. These external keypads start at about $20 US and are wireless, so no cables need to be installed. Good luck!


3

Have someone you trust watch the front of the car when you drive in, drive very slowly until they say "stop" when you are 4-5 inches from the wall, so you are in the garage enough. Then back up, and do it again a few times. Once you're comfortable knowing how long your car is on the bit you can't see (lower front bumper), then drive in slowly and stop ...


3

I make the passenger get out first, but even so, I have flat pack cardboard boxes previously used for various things leaning against the walls of the garage so I don't damage any of the doors myself when opening them in there. I did have to tape them flat - once, one flopped open and I couldn't get out of the driver's side, it stopped the door from opening ...


3

Since cats have superior smelling abilities, they are extremely sensitive to scent-based cat repellents for sale or you can make your own. A really simple homemade one can be mixed with essential oils such as citronella, lavender, peppermint or lemongrass (3 parts water to 1 part oil) in a spray bottle and applied to known or suspect problem areas. You will ...


3

Provide an alternate desirable location for the stray cat. Some are too feral to accept formal domicile. I have wrapped a 100 watt bulb in crumpled aluminum foil as a heat source for tiny critters. Put the "radiator" inside a cardboard box placed in a suitable location with the entrance protected. Some kind of insulation would be an added plus. The ...


3

I am thinking about using some kind of wire brush or metal curry comb. There are some wire brushes in the shape of cylinder that you could simply bowl on that bubble wrap. If brush is sharp enough it should perforate the bubbles. Please note that I've never tested that "lifehack" so it's just a guess.


2

It depends on the lock and the reason it freezes. Some locks just come stuck when they get cold, but most get stuck because there is some liquid in them (like from the snowstorm) that then expands and makes the lock stuck. In this cases it has helped me a lot to put something over the lock. Like use some leather or thick! cloth and attach it (e.G. nail it ...


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