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11

Use a guide bar for pouring. I learned how to do this kind of thing in a lab using a glass rod and a cylindrical container. A similar technique can be used for your household situation. Find a spoon or some round handle utensel that can span the diameter of the sauce pan. Gently, tip the sauce pan using the handle of the spoon where it touches the pan edge. ...


7

That's what ladles are for. Simply scoop the liquid into the cup with a ladle or big spoon. Once you have transferred most of the liquid from the pot to the cup, pouring the rest will be much easier.


6

My hack is to pour in two steps First into a pan that can pour, and is large enough not to spill Second into the target container With the pan sizes I have available, this might need to be done twice.


6

My trick is to hold the nozzle under the running tap as you fill the sink to wash the dishes. This has the twin benefits if removing the crud, whilst stopping it from being wasted because it contributes to the detergent being used for your washing-up. There is a bit of an art to it though, you obviously want to avoid excess water getting INTO the bottle, so ...


5

At first, I was going to suggest breaking up the lumps in a more scientific way, by splitting them into smaller pieces with something like a chisel. But I have thought of a hack. Pour warm water into the jar, not too full. Let it stand, stirring and prodding occasionally with a fork, until the lumps of chocolate have broken up and dissolved. Next step is to ...


4

I once had neighbours who left the protective plastic bags over the seats of their car, that it was delivered with. I presumed so that the seats stayed in nice condition. The problem was, their nice car seats were horrible to sit on and to look at, and IMO the logic was flawed. Here, you want to cover your nice devices in film so they don't get scratched ...


4

Since you have a wood knob, I don't think there is huge amounts of heat. Use a steel-type epoxy like JB-Kwik. First clear any loose bits from the wood knob. Then mix a small amount and force a dab into the hole. Push and twist the knob into place. Any epoxy that leaves the hole and fills the flat gap will add to the strength. If any oozes out, you can wipe ...


4

get you a couple of thin wooden tooth picks. dip them in wood glue and jam them down into the stripped-out hole in the knob, and break them off flush with the backside of the knob. allow to dry, then screw the knob back down onto the threaded stub.


4

I purchased washing up liquid in a pump bottle from some fancy manufacturer once, and I've retained the bottle which I now fill up with the regular soap. I imagine any pump bottle will suffice; in these days of COVID you can probably find any amount of hand wash pump bottles you can refill and a couple of pumps will eject enough soap, plus help use a ...


3

Two part epoxy resin will do a far better job. Clean out the hole, knock in some slivers of wood (toothpicks are my favourite), along with a little premixed adhesive, screw the knob back in. Use next day and for ever.


3

Place a lid on the pan. Place it slightly askew, so there's a small opening on one side. Use potholders or oven mitts to hold down the lid while you pour out the liquid. The lid reduces the amount of liquid that pours out, making it easier to aim.


3

I wanted to see if my idea of pressing the lip in would work, so I opened a can, emptied it and looked for my favorite pair of pliers. These are not it, but they would have to do. My first attempt left a not so pretty folded lip and so I pressed slightly while bending the pliers towards the center of the can. The result doesn't look very pretty with these ...


3

Keep just one water bottle in the door, and move it all the way to the left (nearest the door hinges). This reduces the speed at which the bottle moves when you open the door: excessive speed causes the bottles to fall over. Put the rest of the bottles in the bottle rack.


3

I haven't found a way to avoid it, but this is the easiest way to deal with it: When the buildup becomes problematic (clogging the nozzle), unscrew the top and drop it in a mug filled with warm water. Leave for a few hours. The soap mostly dissolves, any remaining crud is easily scrubbed off. This happens 1-2 times over the life of a bottle.


3

Why don't you just neatly stack them into drawers (They're fairly cheap and you can buy some small ones) or into shelves? I can see there is space for more shelves in the drawer-type thing you are using. Any thin metal ones should do...


3

You can just chop it open with a big knife, as can be seen in this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXhvZC4wNA0


2

Slide a butter knife between the rubber gasket and the metal base, it will open just enough to release the pressure. The lid will easily come off after the hissing stops. Any thin object that can lift the gasket slightly will work. This is not speculation, It worked for me just now and did not damage my mug or cap in any way.


2

I make my own burritos with home-made tortillas, and reheat them from room temperature, from the fridge, and from frozen. There are two keys: wrap the burrito in a paper towel. This absorbs any stray moisture instead of your tortilla doing that use less than 100% power. This gives the heat a chance to even out throughout the burrito. I will occasionally ...


2

As Hobbes pointed out, the bottles fall over because they have room to wobble. So pack the empty space in the door shelf with other things from your fridge (like bottles of condiments). When you get a new large bottle of water / milk / juice, take out the smaller bottles to make room for it, and put those smaller bottles back on the stationary fridge shelves ...


2

The shelf appears to be too wide. HACK: Make the shelf narrower. Make and use a divider from an elastic bungee cord or a large elastic band. Stretch and place a loop around the whole door shelf to form a "front" and "back" row. While the elastic separator will "give" enough to tuck a bottle either in front or behind it, it will (or should be) strong ...


2

Another option: The reason the bottles fall over, is that they have room to wobble. The tray is much wider than the bottle diameter. If you fill the space between the bottle and the front wall of the tray, the bottle will have no room to wobble and fall over. I've called this a "bottle holder" in the image below. You could build this from cardboard, wood ...


2

Assuming that someone drove in the screw in the first place, and that the bracket is slotted where it is fixed to the machine, you might be able to Wiggle the dishwasher back a little to expose the screw. It only needs to move about 1 cm. It looks as though you have been able to remove the screw on the left. If you can't shift the machine further back, a ...


2

Seal one up with just air within, and submerge it very gently in a bowl or sink full of water. We use Lock & Locks, I would expect them to hold, though I'd only test very gently about an inch or two (2-4 cm) below the surface because they're not designed for this. Also, I do have to wonder if (a) you were sold seconds or defectives on the cheap, or (b) ...


1

I fixed my kettle's wooden knob a while ago. I used normal white glue (not school glue which doesn't harden completely). The knob was heavily carboned (burnt). It slid on and off the threaded post easily. I figured that I had nothing left to lose so I filled the burned hole with some white glue and set the lid on it upside down until the glue hardened. It ...


1

Use a funnel, that's what it's intended for.


1

From what you've posted about the frequency of use of your cupboard I don't think you'll encounter much of a problem - opening any cupboard door creates an air movement due to a temporary lower pressure inside the cabinet.. Consider too that manufacturers don't have a problem shipping fridges closed; the last fridge I bought came with it's door mounted and ...


1

Rubber bands. Preferably those of larger sizes that's not too elastic. Just wrap one around a bottle that doesn't have the rounded bottom and the water bottle. (or two rubber bands knotted together, if needed) The likelihood of someone forcing the fridge door open hard enough to knock over two bottles, should be minimal. I've never tried this in a fridge, ...


1

There are so many things being shipped, various kinds of packing materials have become common. Fold a sheet of bubble-wrap in half with the bubbles facing inward. Use the resulting chubby, light, flat shelf-space-filler to put behind the heavy water bottle(s) so it/they don't wobble around. You might want to stick a couple of "pillow paks" between bottles ...


1

I am going to answer the scale part with an alternative suggestion, based on well over four decades of kitchen experience. Note that my answer is usually not considered a “hack”, but the standard approach. When scales like yours are shipped without a matching bowl or container for weighing, they are intended to be used with whatever plate or bowl you are ...


1

A safety can opener removes the lid rather than cutting through it. I have this one https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01H92WATA/ref=cm_sw_r_em_apap_cHX2dtuMOXSZI


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