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4

I purchased washing up liquid in a pump bottle from some fancy manufacturer once, and I've retained the bottle which I now fill up with the regular soap. I imagine any pump bottle will suffice; in these days of COVID you can probably find any amount of hand wash pump bottles you can refill and a couple of pumps will eject enough soap, plus help use a ...


5

My trick is to hold the nozzle under the running tap as you fill the sink to wash the dishes. This has the twin benefits if removing the crud, whilst stopping it from being wasted because it contributes to the detergent being used for your washing-up. There is a bit of an art to it though, you obviously want to avoid excess water getting INTO the bottle, so ...


3

I haven't found a way to avoid it, but this is the easiest way to deal with it: When the buildup becomes problematic (clogging the nozzle), unscrew the top and drop it in a mug filled with warm water. Leave for a few hours. The soap mostly dissolves, any remaining crud is easily scrubbed off. This happens 1-2 times over the life of a bottle.


3

You're correct: adding water and letting it sit for a while makes it easier to clean the pan. I've been doing this for years, and I've noticed no damage to my nonstick frying pan. This also works when you add the water later on (after the pan's been allowed to cool down).


1

As someone that's a landlord and dealt with this a few time this is what works for me. Remove all the offensive matter. Wheel it outside in the yard and hit it with a power washer or at the very least a water hose, spraying it down well, and draining it out, do it many times. Having someone to help tilt it while you do this helps considerably. Then Take a ...


0

I think you'd be better off doing it differently. How it is right now, it fell apart for a reason; you're not solving the reason by just packing the hole. Instead I'd: Use a drill to extend the hole right the way through the knob Use a larger drill to create a recessed hole in the top of the knob Use a longer bolt and locking nut, that goes right the way ...


3

Two part epoxy resin will do a far better job. Clean out the hole, knock in some slivers of wood (toothpicks are my favourite), along with a little premixed adhesive, screw the knob back in. Use next day and for ever.


4

get you a couple of thin wooden tooth picks. dip them in wood glue and jam them down into the stripped-out hole in the knob, and break them off flush with the backside of the knob. allow to dry, then screw the knob back down onto the threaded stub.


1

I fixed my kettle's wooden knob a while ago. I used normal white glue (not school glue which doesn't harden completely). The knob was heavily carboned (burnt). It slid on and off the threaded post easily. I figured that I had nothing left to lose so I filled the burned hole with some white glue and set the lid on it upside down until the glue hardened. It ...


4

Since you have a wood knob, I don't think there is huge amounts of heat. Use a steel-type epoxy like JB-Kwik. First clear any loose bits from the wood knob. Then mix a small amount and force a dab into the hole. Push and twist the knob into place. Any epoxy that leaves the hole and fills the flat gap will add to the strength. If any oozes out, you can wipe ...


0

Yes the easy way to peel an egg it's with the tip of ur thumb crack the egg and gentenly with the thumb peel the skin it would come out easy


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