30

I believe the most efficient way is to use a pillbox, like this one: This is what I do. They are pretty strong, have enough space and they are very cheap. There are many different kinds, if you fancy.


13

It would still be some work, but maybe sewing a colored thread, just a few stitches, could do the trick. This would have the added benefit of not fading when being washed. And you could give each family member its own color (or possibly two; one for light colored socks, and one for dark colored socks).


10

One idea is to use the paper clips to organise your cables. To know which item uses which cable, use bread tags to put a label at both ends of every wire and cable. If you're looking for more practical solutions, see Declutter Your Life: 20 Clever Ways to Keep Cords in Order. Image source: apartmenttherapy


8

You could get a piece of cardboard and cut Mirco SD sized holes into it and then write what each one is above or below its respective hole. You'd need to put a backing on the card so that the SD cards don't just fall straight through if you try and pick the board up - try something like another sheet of cardboard or even paper, if you're looking for a ...


8

This isn't a hack, really, but a nifty existing product made to solve your problem: a credit-card-sized multi-micro-SD holder. I linked that one kind of at random, but there are other similar products, all under $10. In this version, one side has spaces to write to provide a label for each card. Of course, you have to match them to the slot, but assuming ...


7

The credit card microSD card holder suggested by mattdm inspired me to make this. It's part of a foam insert from a cheap cell phone case. A lot of different products come with this common packaging filler material. I cut it down with scissors, cut little slots in the sides with an exacto knife, and stuck a write-on label on it. Mine's 3 x 1.4 inches and ...


6

Get a white permanent marker - Sharpie makes a couple, one with a fine point, one medium, or Pentel Pilot Super Colour in white with a medium tip. Link is to UK Amazon, but it does show the pen... http://www.amazon.co.uk/Pilot-Super-Colour-Medium-Marker/dp/B000OZLKW8/ref=pd_bxgy_229_img_y


6

One of my co-workers saw me struggling with this problem and pointed out that our labelmaker has a special tool built into the plastic next to the cutter. You stick the end of the label in and pull hard, and it curls the end of the label around and makes the two halves separate. If yours doesn't have this feature, you can achieve the same thing with a pen ...


6

There used to be old cases for Nintendo DSI games. Use those, as they fit a Micro SD neatly and can be labeled. Like one below:


5

What I do to remove printed labels is bend the paper slightly at the corner or edge of the label. The corner of the label should pop up where it can be grabbed. The backing is made so the label will come off easily. If necessary use a knife blade to help the edge of the label pop up while bending the paper.


5

Frame challenge answer: Instead of replacing the print, learn to type without looking at the keyboard keys. There are lots of (free) tools available and with a bit of practice you should soon be able to make good progress.


5

By accident I discovered the search term "keyboard stickers" I found a selection on Amazon that look like the ones on my keyboard. They're not expensive so I've ordered some. The reviews say they are durable so here's hoping! Update: They arrived from France and are good quality. The only disappointment is that a sticker for the left-hand Shift key ...


5

Supplementary and referral information storage depends on the kind of information. I don't know any 'one size fits all' solution. I use a multi-disciplinary approach. Date relevant information is placed on a calendar: On my birthday, I replace the batteries for my smoke detector, for example. Time relevant information is placed next to the clock or timepiece ...


4

I use a color marker (example) to paint colored dots on them. (Started using nail polish). I sort them by the first dot color, keep them in pillbox each slot assigned with a color. And on the pillbox a label with the colors and content of each one. Also a spreadsheet as backup or more detailed content description if needed.


4

If I had this problem I think I would use a tiny paintbrush and write a numbering sequence on each one beginning with 001. Keep a spreadsheet saying what the numbers represent. Try to find at Amazon.


4

Cable Ties. - This is what they are designed for really. Got lots of cable that you need to keep together neatly and tuck them all out of the way? If you have lots of wires and cables going to the same place (i.e. the back of a PC) you can just grab them all together and stick a cable tie around them (you could even use string which would have the same ...


4

You could take a picture of the current state of the attached wires. That would let you record which color of which wire goes to which connector. (I can't fully visualize your setup or issue, so this might not work for your situation. But for the situation I am picturing, it works great!)


4

Try iron-on labels. They are similar to your printed labels, only it takes a fraction of the time to iron on a label than to sew on a label! Many people feel that sewed on labels are longer lasting, yet if you use an iron at the correct temperature and keep the iron on the garment for the proper duration, the "glue" in the back of the label will properly ...


4

My hack is to handle the SD cards only along their edges, to reduce wear on their surface. I also suggest using a white permanent marker such as this: image from Amazon Although the can says "paint" the product details describe it as "white permanent ink" so the result ought to be more durable than correction fluid. There are similar inexpensive brands ...


3

Label each bundle when you disconnect them. Then pull them through the conduit one at a time; if you lose a label, you can replace it right then, while the other three wires are known quantities. For the individual colored wires, you might try a "telco" crimp connector. These are made for indoor telephone wire, likely similar to the low-voltage, low-...


3

A bleach pen may work, though the bleach would have the tendency to "bleed" (wick). You would probably not be able to write very clearly, if at all. A dot or "X" may be the only design you could make.


3

I'm not entirely sure how your setup is, but when I was working with an electrician, we would attach the new wire to the old wire, therefore allowing us to pull the new wire into position just by pulling the old wire out, if that makes sense. You could wire in each run that's being replaced by removing the old wire and attaching the new wire one at a time. ...


3

A late answer having run into the same problem. I have a new keyboard ready to use but this one still functions well, apart from the worn out lettering. I can wring a little more life out of this one with a hack. By swapping the key tops around. Replacing the worst keys A, S, N, T with function key tops. A ~ F4 (the 4 is like an A) S ~ F7 (the Seven ...


3

Thermal images fade. They are not archival. Treating them for permanence is an exercise in futility. Rather than all that ridiculous amount of effort to save a thermal image, my HACK is to make a photocopy (with carbon-based toner) that does not fade. Better, make the original image using a black/white laser printer so that you have a choice of stable base ...


3

This is not a complete answer, but my thoughts so far: For small labels, I can use permanent markers or paint markers. These work when it's only a few words. However, the mark rubs off when trying to write on batteries or some plastics. Another solution is QR codes: I can write some short instructions or data and embed that in a QR code and print it and glue ...


3

Some of your examples are information that's only needed occasionally. I tend to keep that type of information in my computer, not with the object. Wound rinse: the bottle is large enough to fit a label, write the expiry date on the label and keep the instructions digitally. Batteries: some batteries have an expiry date printed on them. For others, use a ...


2

All markers, pens, labels are remarkably non-dishwasher-resistant if we wanted them to stay with the exception of those unwanted tags and stickers that for obscure reasons won't go off. Having said that, there are a wide range of products especially designed for use on ceramics which survive many dish-washing procedures, or are even dishwasher resistant. ...


2

To literally label them so you can tell them apart, you need only to make them distinguishable. Think resistor color codes: use a couple different "light" (writes on black background) Sharpies to give each one a distinct color code. You can also completely color over one side with the white/silver Sharpie, and then be able to write a single digit or ...


2

Get two 2-inch pieces of adhesive tape (like Scotch tape or masking tape). Fold over about half an inch on each, to leave a short non-adhesive section. Then stick one of the pieces of tape on the front of your "double sided sticky tape like sticker", and stick the other on the back. You should then be able to pull the 2 pieces apart. Your adhesive tape ...


2

For Casio EZ-Labels at least, Casio advises bending the extreme tip of the label+backing at a sharp angle. I forget whether up or down, but I do this (up AND down a few times), and it works well. HTH


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible