5

By accident I discovered the search term "keyboard stickers" I found a selection on Amazon that look like the ones on my keyboard. They're not expensive so I've ordered some. The reviews say they are durable so here's hoping! Update: They arrived from France and are good quality. The only disappointment is that a sticker for the left-hand Shift key ...


5

Supplementary and referral information storage depends on the kind of information. I don't know any 'one size fits all' solution. I use a multi-disciplinary approach. Date relevant information is placed on a calendar: On my birthday, I replace the batteries for my smoke detector, for example. Time relevant information is placed next to the clock or timepiece ...


5

Frame challenge answer: Instead of replacing the print, learn to type without looking at the keyboard keys. There are lots of (free) tools available and with a bit of practice you should soon be able to make good progress.


4

My hack is to handle the SD cards only along their edges, to reduce wear on their surface. I also suggest using a white permanent marker such as this: image from Amazon Although the can says "paint" the product details describe it as "white permanent ink" so the result ought to be more durable than correction fluid. There are similar inexpensive brands ...


3

Some of your examples are information that's only needed occasionally. I tend to keep that type of information in my computer, not with the object. Wound rinse: the bottle is large enough to fit a label, write the expiry date on the label and keep the instructions digitally. Batteries: some batteries have an expiry date printed on them. For others, use a ...


3

This is not a complete answer, but my thoughts so far: For small labels, I can use permanent markers or paint markers. These work when it's only a few words. However, the mark rubs off when trying to write on batteries or some plastics. Another solution is QR codes: I can write some short instructions or data and embed that in a QR code and print it and glue ...


3

Thermal images fade. They are not archival. Treating them for permanence is an exercise in futility. Rather than all that ridiculous amount of effort to save a thermal image, my HACK is to make a photocopy (with carbon-based toner) that does not fade. Better, make the original image using a black/white laser printer so that you have a choice of stable base ...


3

A late answer having run into the same problem. I have a new keyboard ready to use but this one still functions well, apart from the worn out lettering. I can wring a little more life out of this one with a hack. By swapping the key tops around. Replacing the worst keys A, S, N, T with function key tops. A ~ F4 (the 4 is like an A) S ~ F7 (the Seven ...


2

You may use a correction pen which usually lasts for a long time. I've used this on my keyboard and it really worked.


2

I use self-made stickers, which can be used for at least 3 months each time.


2

Paper Label HACK: Have you considered using an electric (or manual) Branding Iron for your wood products? For use on wood or leather, electric branding irons have solid brass heads that can be set with up to 20 characters per line (including spaces and punctuation). These irons reach over 720°F (382°C) after about 15 minutes. One supplier (search online) ...


1

Your examples look like they all might belong to the same medical/emergency kit. In such case I would mark each item with a number and print a list with the numbers and the instructions to be glued to the kit, likely the inside if the door or lid. Make a space to note the start date (and brand) of the batteries and where you use them. This would also work ...


1

My Hack was inspired by Weather Vane. Replace the letters on the keycaps of the keyboard you have come to love. White Sugru™ mouldable glue would be wear resistant and highly visible against the dark plastic background on your keyboard for the most-used e_t_a_o_i_n_s_ keys, if not all. You would etch the shape of the letter into the keycap with an engraving ...


1

I'd use an engraving pen (rotary abrasive kind) and just write your name in for now. You can perhaps create hardwood plinths later that you will 3D router, or look at a low-powered laser engraver that will burn some wording into the wood; it's much more permanent. If you're after something lifehacky you might find some success with a number and letter punch ...


1

So this is a USB device. Right? For every USB device you can find out the USB manufacturer and probably model. Here is how it could be done in Windows. In Linux this can be done using lsusb command. Having manufacturer and model you can search e.g. on amazon or any other such service for the same keyboard/set. Probably you can find used ones or even broken ...


1

Most SD cards have a label on one side, the other side is bare plastic. You can mark either with just about anything. I use a fine or medium permanent Ink marker (Sharpie or india ink) to put a number on the bare plastic side. My Hakuba clam-shell SD card holder holds eight cards. We place empty cards label side out in the holder as we use cards we put the ...


1

You could take a look at an engraving pen: Image courtesy of Amazon They're like a pen shaped hand held drill, with a fine tip that is diamond abrasive coated. If you lightly make some marks in the case it should be more resistant to degradation from insertion than eg Liquid Paper is The casing on a MicroSD card is quite thin; don't go too deep. There are ...


1

Hold the label in your finger and thumb, with the back of the label on your forefinger. The end of the label should be out from your fingers about 10-5mm. Pull with the index, and push with the thumb, very hard. The end of the sticker will be revealed, and you can take the sticker off. This works every single time regardless of length. as long as enough ...


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