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13

Instead of changing the properties of a metal, the easiest thing would be to permanently have your own set of steelware at the office. Use it a lunch, wash/clean it, store it in your cubicle/office. I usually have my mug and some utensils at my workplace, I rather spend a couple of minutes washing them than using things I don't feel comfortable with(I've ...


8

The best choice is to use a magnet. All you have to do is is get a magnet bar that is about the length of five of your washers (bigger is better). Now just run the magnet over the washers and it will pick them up. Depending on the strength of your magnet, it may take more than one run. It will look something like this, but with metal washers Image Source ...


7

Brass musical instruments are coated with clear lacquer to prevent contact with skin acids from corroding the metal -- and it's corrosion products left on your skin that you're smelling. You should be able to eliminate the smell on your hands by thoroughly cleaning the brass on the top (soft scouring powder such as Bon Ami, a careful rinse, followed by ...


7

Two ways I know of. One: run a high-volume, high-speed vacuum with the hose inlet right against the drilling point. Two: fill the drill flutes with axle grease (shortening from the kitchen should also work) to capture the shavings. Wipe off and replace the grease before each new hole. I'd recommend testing either method before starting, but neither one ...


6

Seltzer water(carbonated water) Put your ornaments into seltzer water for around 5-10 mins and brush them. Ex club soda or coke House hold dish wash soaps Soak the ornaments in warm water for 5 mins and scrub with toothbrush using dish washing soap liquids. Using toothpaste This is very common method and I've used many times. Just apply tooth paste and ...


5

Silver tarnish can be removed electrolytically by putting the silver object in an aluminum container (e.g. an aluminum foil pie plate) with water with baking soda dissolved in it. The silver must be in contact with the aluminum and completely covered by the salt water. Warming gently speeds this up. It should be cleaned as you watch in less than a minute! ...


5

Since it's actually etched into the metal, you'll need to buff the sink to a consistent finish. One method, assuming it's a stainless steel surface, is to use a mild abrasive with oxalic acid, such as Barkeepers Friend and clean and abrade the entire sink with a sponge or cloth. This will require a lot of rubbing. If that does not produce a consistent ...


5

Masking tape is another trick that may be convenient if a magnet isn't on hand. Take a big piece, pick up as many as you can, pull them off, repeat. Use a new piece of tape if it loses its stickiness. Edit: The technique is to use one hand, slowly pull the length of tape through the air and gently put it down so it lays flat and touches as many items as ...


5

Oxalic acid, or cleaners with oxalic acid, such as Barkeepers Friend, are effective at removing stains from stainless steel. If the surface is lacquered brushed steel or brushed aluminum, though, they could damage the finish. The cleaners themselves, though, may leave a bit of powdery abrasive residue that has to be removed.


5

If you really want to avoid brushing the coins the easiest method is pour them in a container with coke, let them simmer in it for around 20 min or after you see the dirt and whatever else the coins might have comes off. Afterwards just rinse them in water to avoid stickiness. Note: I don't know how beneficial or harmful would putting them all together ...


5

Here's a quick hack to ensure no metal bits escape your work piece. •Use a drill for sheet metal. (Small holes use a twist drill.) •Use a punch to slightly dent the metal where you want to drill to keep the bit from wandering. •Place a piece of wood behind the sheet metal so as to not dent the case. •Push the drill bit through a wad of modelling clay. (This ...


4

If it ain't broken, don't fix it. 3.5mm connectors are fragile. They're frequently abused. They won't last forever. Every action you perform on it may weaken the structural integrity. As Ian said in the comments, the chances of you making it worse are quite high. If you really have to fix it: Grab two thin pliers, put one one the midsection and one on the ...


4

We find the white melamine sponges (sold as Magic Eraser, but there are generic types widely available) can work really well, but they warn against using it on the front of stainless-steel appliances without trying it in an inconspicuous area first. Wipe in the direction of the brush finish, not in swirly motions.


4

The cutlery at work tastes metallic. Usually you bring your own, but when you forget, you have to use theirs. So just leave your own at work, and wash them after each use. To prevent it from getting stolen, buy cutlery with small holes in: Or drill them in yourself. Now you can pass a thin (wallet-style) chain through the holes to secure the cutlery to ...


4

Try using Coke. I stopped drinking it after I saw what it did when I left a coin and a bullet casing in it. Video Article


4

Especially aluminium tent pegs are a bit tricky. Most metals will become harder as they are 'worked' (as in getting bent) and the initial bend when you hit the stone will have the effect that the bend itself is harder than the straight metal around it. So if you now try to bend them back in shape you will notice the peg bending left and right of the original ...


3

A bit of a late answer but after researching this a tad myself I may have a bit of relevant data and conjecture to contribute in the case that anyone may see this topic as well and desire a way to rid their cutlery of the metallic taste. I found an article in a similar discussion online: http://www.ttl.fi/en/publications/Electronic_publications/Documents/...


3

"Just Do It" suggested leaving clean utensils at your desk every day. Another option, if you have a lunch bag that you always use to bring your food, is to have a set of utensils that you always leave in your lunch bag. When you get home, you could either wash them and put them back in your lunch bag, or put them in the sink/dishwasher and put a clean set in ...


3

Use a vacuum cleaner and attach an old panty hose / stocking on the front of the inlet. If the parts are small enough o be sucked in the vacuum, they will stick to the thin fabrik and you can peel them of or simply shut down the cleaner with the inlet over your container. http://www.instructables.com/id/25-Unique-Uses-for-Pantyhose/step4/Vacuum-Find-Lost-...


3

It looks as though the magnet is stuck to a raised black metal piece, and "above" it is non-magnetic wood. My solution is to slide one end of the magnet "up", so it sticks out over the wood area. Once that tip is sticking out, you should be able to grab it with your fingers (or pliers) and lift it off the metal. It will be even easier if you can prevent the ...


3

I wanted to see if my idea of pressing the lip in would work, so I opened a can, emptied it and looked for my favorite pair of pliers. These are not it, but they would have to do. My first attempt left a not so pretty folded lip and so I pressed slightly while bending the pliers towards the center of the can. The result doesn't look very pretty with these ...


2

I had the same problem - the stains on my stainless steel sink were caused by pool acid. I used Brasso and the stains are completely removed.


2

My trick to getting them unbent is to use something of the same shape, like a few other tent-pegs, to use as a mould and then beat/bend them into shape again. That is, if they are shaped in v-form, you can put two or three together, put them on the ground, and then put the bent tent-peg on top of these and apply force to the bend to get it conform to the ...


2

The professional way to clean jewellery is to use an ultrasonic bath. The vibration releases the dirt particles from the smallest recesses of the jewellery. To do this as a hack you need to replicate the vibration as best you can. Place the jewellery in a small dish and cover it with water in which you add a small amount of washing up liquid. This now ...


2

Use a thicker, better quality ring to replace the smaller ring. The wire type key ring holder is meant for quick attachment of keys to a tag, not long term use in a pocket. You can find an assorted set of sizes in a package at almost any hardware store.


2

You can use tamarind and lemon to scrub the coins and then wash them with water finally. Just soak some tamarind in water for some time and then scrub the coins. Cut a lemon into two halves and then use a half to scrub the coins Finally wash with water. My mom uses this technique to clean the bronze and copper vessels and trust me they give a fresh and ...


2

I would try the following: 1) Scour the trough with steel wool, to loosen all particles. 2) Brush the loosened particles to one end of the trough. 3) Use a vacuum (especially with a narrow attachment!) to get out as many particles as you can. You can also sweep / brush the particles to the end again, and vacuum them out again. 4) To remove the final ...


1

Key "rings" exist that don't have pointy ends. I've seen some where the 2 ends screw together securely; I think this picture shows one that's just spring-loaded.


1

This is probably going to look like an ad but it isn't I'm just going to let you know about a product that I bought recently and it helped me with my key problems and yours was one of them, it's called keysmart It basically helps you organize your keys. So far I'm loving it, it's sturdy and good quality material(hopefully it lasts long) as of now I have no ...


1

Take toothpaste and a toothbrush and clean the jewelry like you clean your teeth. I use Colgate toothpaste to clean my ring and it shines as if it were new.


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