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19

Cheap aluminum carabiners are what I use; they're available in different sizes for about $1 or less (you don't need the expensive ones for climbing). Not only can they grab eight or more plastic bags to carry them, but they keep the bags from spilling their contents in the trunk. For individual items, keep some bags in the car.


17

This is exactly what a baby formula dispenser is for. They normally have three separated compartments with a top that you can rotate to easily empty the contents of a single compartment.


13

Carry them in one of the round boxes blank CD-roms come in sometimes.


10

Use a ramp to push it into your trunk. You can take the ramp with you to unload at your grammy's home...


10

The trick is to sort of isolate your arm and shoulder from the rest of your body when you're moving, so that your body's moving but the combined unit of your arm, shoulder, and hand carrying the drink isn't. The only way I can achieve this is to fix my attention on what I'm carrying rather than looking at the floor or stairs as I walk, but it's much more ...


10

Get an old VHS tape at a thrift store -- should cost less than a dollar. Be sure to select the kind with a snap-closed clamshell case, not those that just slide the cassette into a sleeve. Pull out the tape and discard it (or watch it, if you have a VHS machine and found a title you like). Put the book where the tape was, close the case, and your book is ...


9

I improvised my own case for my knife. 1. Wrap it in a towel: 2. Put the towel-wrapped knife in a pencil case, and close it: This seems to work, even though the knife is a little too loose in the case, in my opinion, though it doesn't seem to have an affect on the sharpness of the knife, since it's protected by the towel. I suppose I could stuff the case ...


9

It helps a lot if you hold the drink loosely, in the tips of your fingers so there won't be a lot of shock when walking, making the drink spill less. I know this from my own experience, as a waitress.


9

If it's big enough for your servings, use Kinder Surprise eggs. These are things you usually throw away but can use for storing various things. Further, I think click-clack mint boxes could work as well. Basically any small container you already have laying around, which is more or less air tight, could work. I have no experience with powders but if ...


9

Indian takeaway restaurants provide chutneys in small sealable plastic containers, about 3cm in diameter. I collect these after a curry and they make perfect containers for individual doses of soluble drinks.


9

The flexibility of the piece is the difficulty to overcome. The air blast will make keeping the shape of the mattress difficult so it will let airflow distort it. It will be tough to fasten it securely enough no matter how many straps you use. Wrap your mattress in plastic to protect it from dirt, debris, and insects. Best way would be to box the mattress so ...


8

How about cling-wrap? You could cover any bowl, container, cup, etc. over the top, and it would become a makeshift lid. I realize it is something else to have in your desk, and it costs money, but if all else fails it might just be the best solution :) Good luck!


8

Rule #1: bag everything. doubled. A trick I've used, although this won't work up flights of stairs, is to put all bag handles over a broom handle. Just be sure not to tilt the broom in a way that allows bags to fall off the open end.


8

To keep your items cool over 5 to 6 hours you may need an insulating thermal bag designed to keep content at their temperature a bit longer than from a conventional bag. Such bags may be available at your grocery store, at a pharmacy, or even from a Pizza delivery service. To additionally cool your items I would go for a gel ice pack rather than ice cubes ...


7

I've used a medium-large sized backpack to lug groceries in the absence of available transportation. A large backpack can easily fit in a weeks worth of groceries safely. A bonus is the environmental friendless of not needing any bags (and cost saving if you live in a place that charges extra for grocery bags). Below is an image of a smallish pack that ...


7

When moving a cement mixer recently I used a small trailer, and self built ramp. The ramp consisted of two lengths of wood, 2"x4" (48 mm x 198 mm) and 5 ft (150 cm) length. Here is an image of how you could make the ramp: The trick to using lenghts of wood for a ramp, is to make sure that they doesn't break nor slip. Proper dimensioned planks ensure no ...


7

Unless your name is Bruce Banner and the thought of hiring someone makes you angry, you need help. See if there's an organization near you similar to Seattle's "Millionairs Club" -- they specialize in day labor, staffed by homeless or otherwise disadvantaged men (men only in this case, but that may not always be the case -- tell them what you're doing, they'...


6

You can easily make a sheath out of heavy denim material. Use brass rivets around the perimeter. No stitching is required. The blade should slide along the rivets upon entry and exit. Search google for "brass rivets". No need to post a link. Get the denim, order the rivets and tool, get a hammer, and you should be able to knock one out in an hour.


6

This might not help for cycling, but when I walk with lots of bags of groceries, I put the handles through a carabiner. It's thick enough that it won't dig into your hand as much as plastic or cloth bags.


6

You don't state where you live, but I'll assume UK since you've posted a question about UK over at academia. This means that Eur-Pallets should be readily available at your location; i found used ones on ebay for about €10 each. They are rated to hold 1250 kg, which should be more than enough for your use case. Fasten some wheels like these to the corners. ...


6

This one from Tupperware carries bagels. You can look for "bagel container" or similar terms to get more results on similar products. Tupperware bagel container on Amazon A peek of what it looks like:


6

Remove the legs from the table, tape the glass TO the table to ensure it doesn't slide around. You now have a holdable moving platform for the glass :)


6

The easy way: a siphon. You need a hose long enough to reach from the bottom of the source vessel, over the edge, and to a lower point outside the source, and a way to place the receiving vessel below the source. Fill the hose with your liquid (if it's not something you'd want to drink, there are pump-hose combinations available for this operation), and as ...


5

I've lived on the third floor of apartment building before with no elevator, so making one trip was a priority because who wants to climb those stairs over again or go outside in the cold/heat again. Some things I would do to hopefully make this happen are : never say paper when they ask paper or plastic ask to double bag them all or double bag them all ...


5

Use a folding shopping cart, which you can keep in the trunk/back or behind a seat. You could combine it with the carabiners that @DrMoishe Pippik mentioned above, so you can hang bags (or other things with handles) off the side, and in the front, if the cart can't carry anything. If you have stairs to go up, get one that can climb stairs. They have three ...


5

Get some reusable bags. I have the ones below and they are fantastic. They have nice big handles. I do not have to worry about them ripping. Plus they are better for the environment! Two ore three of these can fit a weeks+ worth of grocery's.


5

you can easy amend/alter a wooden box like this one here on the ground fit in a felt or a foam material. in the lid of the box stick on with wood-glue, 2-3 small wood-cames or a wood-bar, that fixes this nice knife down in the box. this wood-boxes you can find easily on amazon or in your local hardware-stores. if the box comes without a lock you can easy ...


5

Use the passenger seat belts with cushions. Make sure there are no loose items that can fly into the TV.


5

Easiest solution when you can't carry the larger vessel is to use a Baster Syringe(I think everyone knows them as the turkey syringe), it might be a bit tedious, but once you've emptied the large vessel enough you might be able to carry the vessel and finish the task at a faster pace, unless the vessel itself is already too heavy or in reality just too large ...


5

Another option(and probably a bit messier one) is to use an old cup(or whatever measure works best) and start taking out the liquid, then use a funnel to pour it into the smaller vessel, and if it's cooking oil what you're transferring you can put a coffee filter in the funnel that way you can avoid any residues to enter the smaller vessel.


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