9

I had a similar problem. I've got a modular bookcase where you can place the shelves at varying heights. To maximize the number of books, I placed the shelves quite close together. That led to issues with keeping books organized: books from the same author with different heights would end up on different shelves. I ended up increasing the space between ...


4

If you do not need it to look like a slash, you can use a different substitution character. If you want the character to actually look like a slash, you can use the division slash, unicode U+2215. The best option for the backslash alternative is probably the double backslash character, unicode U+244A.


4

One option for marking the spot a book has been removed from is to insert a token of some sort: tab made from a manila folder or card stock, plastic tab, bookmark with tassel, etc. When a related volume must be stored elsewhere, perhaps a reference object (piece of manila folder, card stock, etc.) with the location marked.


3

Yes!! I hated it while in school. Luckily, there is a great solution, something called Reinforcement Labels, which come also in the form of small rings you stick on each hole of the paper. There are many brands, e.g. you can buy this on Amazon: It's lots of work to put on each hole, but worth it, in the long run. :)


3

My hack is for part of the question – replacing a book in its original position. Withdraw the adjacent book part way, so that you can see the place. If that is made awkward because neighbouring books are different sizes, then also Rotate the adjacent book so that you can see its top/bottom instead of the spine. Having said that, I organise my books ...


2

The easiest hack for avoiding your particular issue with hole-punched paper is do not use that system to bind paper into a book block. A Spring-Clamp Spine uses a system that works similar to a binder clip but is larger and easier to handle. Sheets do not require hole-punching. A Spring-Clamp Spine binder can securely hold from one page to over 250 without ...


2

Some binders have an extra metal part, which can be tightened to hold down the papers when the binder is not in use: (Image source: Wikipedia / Jaques) This does not help when the binder is in use, but when you are carrying it, the pressure on the papers spreads the force and avoids tearing the holes.


2

Always carry the binder either flat or with its spine downwards. Then any force or shock to the paper where the rings pass through is not in the "weak" direction towards the edge of the paper. The added benefit is that should any paper come loose, or not be punched and secured, it does not fall out. When leafing through the binder contents, turn ...


2

Organizing a book collection can be made easier by isolating some exceptions that can be problematic. Libraries pull large books aside and store them together separately in an "Oversize" section. If most of your books are large then you would pull small books aside to store together. Most all books made for mass market are very similar in size to ...


1

Put them in a giant building with giant shelves to accommodate ample spacing for all size books. Just do it like barnes and noble. In this way you can have the option to sort by topic and by size and there's enough room to display the book title for any style of book design. If you don't have a giant building reduce the number of shelves or books. If you ...


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