8

I found this out by experimenting with a theory: If I wipe my body with the flat/palm of my hand, it does remove some of the water. But if I angle my hand so that only the edge of my palm and little finger are pressing against my skin, it is rather more effective. I think the reason for this is because I can apply greater pressure with the edge of my hand ...


7

I actually do this, but apparently not to the same effectiveness as the lady. I simply "squeegee" myself off with my hands after a shower to get rid of the large majority of the water, but I still use a towel to get actually dry. I'm sure if I spent more time doing this method, I'd get more water off myself. I'm sure it would also work better if ...


5

If there is sufficient space where the metal piece normally sits, slide a flexible piece of any kind of wire such as a straightened paper clip between the layers of the mask. UPDATE: When there is no convenient tube, fold the top edge of the mask over a pipe-cleaner to form a "hem." Use a thin strip of tape to close the seam. The fuzzy pipe cleaner will ...


4

If the stick is stuck to the sides of the container, you could try one or more of these to free it: Remove the cap and tap the stick against a hard surface. Submerge the whole stick (with cap on) in warm water to soften the plastic, and then either ... try the wheel again, or ... flex the tube to try and break the adhesion.


3

It looks like the container is made out of plastic, so it can be cut easily. The following hacks may work. Cut the container and fill the gel in an empty cream or petroleum jelly box, something like this. So you can use your fingers and apply in armpits just like we take cream out of such box. Or cut the container and fill the contents into empty glue ...


3

pipe cleaners rust when they are kept in a damp state. If you want to wash them in soap and water, you have to dry them out thoroughly when done- or else they will rust. a better solution is to use aluminum wire inserted into a seam in the mask for maintaining shape. aluminum wire will not rust and is sold in hardware stores for hanging pictures on walls. ...


3

You probably won't like my answer. The most common reason for dry scalp (not dandruff) is too much shampooing according to my doctor that deals with allergies and other skin conditions. Don't wash your hair more than once or twice a week. Soap dries your skin out. Even water can do that if your skin is really sensitive. And be careful not to use too much ...


2

I have tried all of the above with varied levels of success and frustration. I have found the best way, for me, is to use a lint remover roller... it already has a lightly adhesive paper tape to hold the non-sticky side of the bandage to it. What you need: room with a mirror, lint removal roller, handheld mirror, long shoehorn or spatula, bandage. Place the ...


2

You can't completely bypass the retail market for a hair-conditioner Lifehack. You'll still have to go to the grocery store for Vinegar (white or cider). It's pretty simple. After you shampoo your hair, use a rinse made with one part vinegar and three or four parts water. Let it sit in your hair for a couple of minutes. Various kinds will give you ...


2

We don't recommend products here, but my hack is: You have a few days to experiment with different types of bandage and oil, on some other part of your body, to find out which combination is most easily removed. Edit The question suggests you might be thinking of using a plaster like in the left picture: Thinking outside the box, you can keep adhesive ...


2

You've indicated it takes about 3-4 months for your toothbrush to become hard. This is, coincidentally, the period for which dental professionals recommend is a the useful, healthy life of a toothbrush Throw it away and buy another


2

Don't dry them in the dryer, the rubbing is where almost all the wear comes from over time. Instead, air dry them. I put an air circulating fan pointed at my clothes and they dry fast, like being outside in a breeze. Also, I suggest turning them inside out when washing, just for a little extra protection against wear when cleaning


2

If you don't have pipe cleaners, glue on a twist tie. People making makeshift masks at the beginning of the pandemic were frequently requesting them. Pro level - hot glue a dab on the ends so they don't poke through the mask.


1

That is actually a matter of education. It is also a matter of having enough and proper places where to store clothes. I am myself not very well educated in these matters. In the past, my clothes were everywhere. I implemented 2 changes: I decided to be more careful, where I dump my clothes (clean, still wearable, dirty). I am more strict in declaring ...


1

A slight variation of Stan’s suggestion: Use the flexible metal strip from a binder (the thin part in the photo), they are pliable enough to mold well and stable enough to keep their shape well. Don’t bother with poking holes or folding for a hem. Place the metal in parallel to the top border on the outside of the mask and affix it to the mask with a strip ...


1

1) Don't be enticed by marketing. The cheapest conditioner you can buy will have virtually the same effect as the most expensive you can buy. 2) Some years ago I heard that one of the tricks of the modelling trade was to use mayonnaise as hair conditioner. Might be worth a try - but I expect it will be no cheaper than the cheapest conditioner you can buy. ...


1

The hack answer – when the main issue is the safety of yourself and others – is Throw those masks away and buy ones that are fit for purpose.


1

Treated insect netting often contains synthetic or natural chrysanthemum odour which has proven effective deterrent for many insects in addition to the mesh physical barrier. Chrysanthemums contain Pyrethrin which is a powerful insect deterrent. You may be sensitive to the treatment given the fabric. Chrysanthemum derivative has been used to treat clothing ...


1

I would recommend washing new nets often after first purchasing because of the smell.


1

Baby oil is very much a uniform product across brands -- light mineral oil with scent added. You could use any commercial brand, or mineral oil sold as a laxative, or light machine oil as is used for guns or sewing machines, with effectively the same results except they smell different. Adhesive bandages come in broadly three classes: cheap, common, and ...


1

Stay Cool… Treat your blue denim as you would delicate fabrics when laundering to preserve the deep (blue/black/red/?) colour and crisp feel. Here are a few points to keep in mind: Choose the "delicate" setting on the washer if there is one. Avoid hot water and strong detergent which works to thin the cotton fibres. Avoid hot air temperatures when drying ...


1

Do you have keys on you? Use those. A pen on hand? Use the back end.


1

For 10 years I've relied on castile soap, natural conditioner occasionally, and a daily application of hair pomade after showering. Personally I prefer Dr. Bronner's for my soap and conditioner, and Badger for my pomade. The washing/conditioning of hair is self-explanatory. For pomade, take an amount approximately equivalent to half the size of the final ...


1

Idk if this has been mentioned yet but I always save those little square alcohol wipes that come prepackaged. The ones you see at doctor's offices and hospitals to wipe a person's finger before collecting a blood sample. They're often included in screen protector kits. You could buy an entire box and use them as needed or when other options aren't as easily ...


1

TP and tape. It's readily available (less now, of course) and is very easy to apply. This is the method I use, with a roll near me when I work with anything that might cause injury. Downside being that some fibers stick to the wound after, which might not be optimal. In my experience, it has never caused any issues, but it may, depending on the wound. If you ...


1

My hands and feet seem to get cold when my body wants to conserve heat. Despite my body not feeling chilly, the problem goes away if I put on a sweater (slow) or drink a mug of hot water or tea (faster). But I don't imagine that will help if the problem is that the floor is cold.


1

I have tried everything. When the concrete/tiled floor is cold it makes my feet cold. It has nothing to do with circulation. I bought some heated socks. They are life savers! They've changed my life. I charge the batteries every night and they last morning 'til night. Amazing things!


1

A humidifier in your bedroom while you sleep is a great option, as well as Secaris nasal gel.


1

No substance containing any kind of oil is good for a dry nose. It can get into your lungs and cause an abscess. You should only use water based moisturizers or sterilized or distilled water which is what most commercial products are made from. read the medical literature on the internet. Don't depend on unqualified opinions.


1

It may be that your body is choosing its second-best breathing method to nose breathing because your sinuses have some degree of swelling. Swelling decreases during the day, as we are moving around going about our business, because physical activity decreases inflammation; but at night, as we are lying still, swelling, well, swells up. I was a primarily ...


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