Hot answers tagged

60

If you have 5-10 year old sons, daughter, nieces and nephews (basically kids you trust with a ring), get a group of them together and tell them that whoever finds the ring in the grass will get $20 (or some other appropriate, parent-approved prize). Also have cake & ice cream for those who didn't find it.


34

Obvious but expensive answer: wave a metal detector over your lawn. Maybe a friend has one you could borrow?


34

Go outside that night with a very strong flashlight or preferably a higher-intensity floodlight. With any luck, the glint of any metal object will stand out considerably compared to anything else you might find among the grass. Work systematically. Search the lawn one square at a time. You are much more likely to find something searching one square meter at ...


18

First of all, do not assume it is in the garden unless you are absolutely certain. If there is any possibility it is somewhere else, then those other places must be systematically searched. Do not use a rake. Do not walk around on, or otherwise disturb in any way the search area. Randomly casting around for the object is a bad idea. The way to find the ...


9

Someone I know would advise you to look in the fridge first. (And if you are a hot drink drinker, around the kettle or coffee machine.) Seriously, walk the way through the house as you would have done when getting out of the car after the last time you had your keys. Look at all surfaces you pass, that is also on the floor, each of the tables and chairs and ...


8

Maybe you could attach the remote to something big so that it's easier to find if it gets lost.


6

A gold ring is, in effect, a tuned circuit. Though a metal detector would find lumps of any type of metal, such as nails in the wall, a grid dip meter (GDM), used by electronics and radio amateurs, or "hams, could identify a closed loop of a good conductor such as gold alloy. Calibrate the GDM by comparison with another ring of close to the same diameter, ...


5

Crows here in the Pacific Northwest find everything. I threw a loaf of bread squares onto my lawn one morning, trying to remember where I put my single car key. Voila, a crow buggered around and flipped the key so I could see it. Luckily he didn't use it for his nest.


4

You could try raking the grass, with any luck the ring might hook onto one of the many tines on the rake and thus be retrieved. If it doesn't hook on, it should be easy to hear the metal on metal 'ding' noise once you've scraped over it.


4

Here are few methods to find the ring. This might look a bit complicated but this method helped me to find few small objects on floor. Keep a torch in your hand and place your head on the floor in such a way that one of your eyes will be just above floor ( your sight should be almost parallel to the floor ). Close your other eye which is far from floor. ...


3

I think there is only one way that is pretty sure to work. One by one, empty each room of every object. You'll need an empty room or a large clear area to stage removed objects. An alternative to this, though less reliable is to picture each room as a grid. Work methodically through the grid, lifting, opening, prying, whatever to clear that grid. This is ...


3

Close the blinds & drapes, turn off all the electronics, wait until night, and use a very bright flashlight.


3

You could also try the old vacuum panty hose trick. Your neighbors might think you are crazy, if they see you vacuuming the lawn :)


3

If you're using smart TV and it is connected to the same WiFi of your device, or it is capable of Bluetooth then you can try apps that can substitute your remote control. Dijit - Uses Bluetooth, WiFi iRule - Uses Wifi RedEye - Like Dijit Rē - IR Dongle


2

I think you can try tie/glue/tape a piece of string to it and tie the other end somewhere near your couch, or wherever you sit to watch TV. If that dangles too much, maybe you can try fixing one of those retractable lanyard thing to your remote so it doesn't still end up at random places because it will retract to that one spot.


2

You don't have to come to that if you choose a specific place to put your specific keys, that way wouldn't lost it at first place(unless you're very much drunk). You can buy LED key ring so that it will glow when you switch off light. Apart from this I don't have any idea. Stripping sound buzzer would be costly idea but would save some time.


2

Attach a keyring finder to it. In general, avoid the whistle-activated ones, I find they're too sensitive and go off randomly. I'd probably go for one that doesn't use a remote, otherwise you're going to end up with a recursive problem. My favourite would probably be one activated by smart phone. Activated by button rather than by sound, and you can ...


2

The issue is that you can organize your life in different ways, depending on the paradigm you use: "employee, son, father, etc." is one, "I, other people, my things" is another. All these paradigms have value depending on how you're thinking of your life at the moment. Folders won't work for this because each digital thing would need to exist in only a ...


2

Try looking underneath things that you recently touched and may have put down on top of your keys. Try looking at or above eye level in case you set them on top of something higher than normal. Try the cracks of cushions. Think whether you might have bumped them off a counter into a trash can. "Clean until you find it" often works. You may find it under ...


1

In my world, it has to be handy or it will not be used. I use a Wiki which is the simplest database that is: fully searchable, relational, extremely flexible, fast, and cross-platform. It will sit in a cloud if you wish. It can evolve with you. It is the epitome of elegance. What else can you say about twelve lines of code? Can you say,"Wikipedia"? My ...


1

Purchase a Tile and attach to your key ring. They work brilliantly. See https://www.thetileapp.com/en-us/


1

Try making it all dark in the house and using a flashlight/torch you can also ask around to see if anyone has seen it also so you don't have to go up to someone who thought they had a cute ring and say "hey that's my ring" get the word out fast and search everyday till you find it


1

I'd say the best answer to this problem is to buy another, identical remote for your use. Keep it locked, or hidden away. If the rest of the household loses their remote, it's their problem. They will soon miss you finding it for them, and maybe they will then learn amongst themselves to place the remote in a designated spot when not in use.


1

Your main problem seems to be that you're the only one with a bit of discipline, and you're the only one who wants to put it in a given place. In other words, the issue is much more than just having a good place to put your remote control. You either need to train other members of your household to return it/place it somewhere, or you need to work around ...


1

Rather than attaching something to the remote, make a place for it that is more attractive/easy to use: Various places sell sofa-side magazine holders, or trays. Have one of these on the most useful end of the sofa. Use tape to mark out a silhouette of the remote (or remotes, as many of us have) and tag it with the name of the remote. This should help ...


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