Hot answers tagged

23

You could try to fill it with paper (e.g. newspaper), then you could put them in front of blower. If the paper gets wet, replace it (or use the fan if you have one).


22

More than the material used, it is the techniques that determines the tightness of a knot. One of the safer shoe lace knots is the reef knot (with loops to ease opening). Unfortunately many people, including myself, only learned how to make a granny knot, which is not as secure and easily gets loose. Both knots are extremely similar: Reef knot (left ...


20

I know this sounds crazy but I swear it works: As long as there is no metal on the shoes (tips of shoelaces, ringlets around lace holes, etc.), put the shoes in the microwave for 15-20 seconds. Then take them out and immediately put them on your feet with thick socks on and tie them as tightly as possible. Walk around until the shoes completely cool down....


15

Depending on the type of hole, you may be able to plug it with silicone. Vendors sell silicone (primarily for cars) in squeezable tubes. Dry your shoe thoroughly and apply the silicone to the hole. Try to fill the entire hole. If the hole goes all the way through the shoe, then also try the duct tape on the inside to provide another layer of protection. Get ...


12

In my experience, brushes are better for "maintenance shining", where you just want a quick touch-up. For a high shine, I've always found a rag to be more effective. You can use just about any soft, lint-free cloth, but my favorite was old t-shirts. Polish with a back-and-forth motion of the cloth at high speed. In addition, once you have it mostly done, ...


12

I have seen my girlfriend fixing this problem with hair elastics which she is always carrying on her hair or in the bag. Put this elastic around your foot and under the flip-flop


12

One can put a small knot at the ends of the laces. One can still tie the laces as usual but since the knot is a bit thicker than the rest of the laces, they cannot slip through the holes anymore.


10

I speculate that wearing thicker socks will help with both the accelerated "wearing in" by stretching the shoes more and with the reduced discomfort by providing a physical barrier between your skin and the currently ill fitting shoes. If the shoes are uncomfortable because they are simply too tight (as opposed to "hard" and abrasive around the foot hole), ...


10

Inspired by this post, I tried using some cardboard from a box of pasta. It worked pretty well. I don't think it will last forever, but there is plenty more cardboard produced through normal purchases. Fold the box flat by open the ends. Mold the box into a curved shape similar to that of a shoehorn. Insert into shoe, and your foot should slide in to the ...


9

Use duct tape on the inside under the footpad/insert. The weight of your heel will help the tape form a good seal, keeping water out.


9

In order to answer your question the first thing we need is to consider what causes your shoes in becoming bad in smell. Based on this link it states: Shoe odor is actually caused by the feet, namely, the bacteria that live on human skin. These bacteria in the sweat produced by humans are part of the body’s cooling mechanism. If you are in a tropical ...


9

One option could be to add an extra layer of rubber on your soles. There exists rubber sole spray which are made for either fixing soles, giving better traction to soles, improve winter shoes, and so on. This extra layer would most likely remove the squeaking. Just to verify that it is actually the outer soles which are squeaking, you could try adding duct ...


9

Speaking from experience on the farm, during the winter months where our shoes/boots would get soaked from melting snow and needing them dry for the next day: putting them on/near a furnace register works well. Make sure the air is blowing on or at the shoes. It doesn't even have to be into the shoes, although that works best. Just getting the heat and ...


8

Growing up as a skateboarder I had to constantly deal with holes in my shoes. The two best ways to fill them and also make sure they are waterproof are: Shoe Goo, which is available in most places including Walmart and Amazon, easy to use, takes a few hours to set up properly and works for a long time. Sets to a bit of a soft consistency which can make it ...


8

I heard freezing the chewing gum will help to remove, but I don't like to put my dirty shoe inside the freezer in any way. Then don't put the shoe in the freezer, rather apply ice directly to the gum. Ideally use a plastic wrap or similar to stop the gum getting wet as the ice melts.


8

The best hack for this is to use a bread clip. Push the peg back through the hole. Now put the bread clip around the broken peg. You don't have to, but you can glue it using super glue for more strength. If you don't have a bread tab or you want the extra strength, but you don't have super glue, you can just use hair pin or a paper clip. You'll have to put ...


7

Whenever I attend music festivals I end up using the hair dryer in the hotel room. Not as easy as a clothes dryer, but it works :) Note: do not leave the hair dryer in the shoes or they'll light on fire.


7

How can I best tumble-dry my sneakers without the noise and risk of the door opening and stopping the cycle? You don't. A tumble dryer is not meant for shoes. It will not dry them particularly effectively, and both the shoes and the dryer may suffer damage if you try. Instead, just set the shoes out to dry in a warm (but not too hot!) place, preferably ...


7

Go to the nearest cafe and take some cocktail tooth picks and use them to keep the strap in place. You can do this by pushing the strap back through the hole and then pushing the cocktail sticks through the plastic bobble end bit in a cross shape. If the wooden/plastic cocktail stick is not strong enough to push through the material, use a fork to create a ...


6

A few methods to consider: Get them wet and wear them for a few hours. Sounds counter intuitive I know, but most leather shoes/boots are pre-shrunk so wetting and wearing will help to stretch them out and form them to your feet. I've used this method with combat boots and it seems to work well. Spraying the inside of leather shoes/boots with equal parts 1:1 ...


6

In general most items which are reasonable flat and narrow can be used as replacements for a shoehorn. Items like rulers, a suitable stick, large wooden spoons, or similar items. If you are in a real pinch, you could use other kitchen utensils, like pie cutter, sausage tongs. Anything long and flat could do. On an alternative approach, you could try using ...


6

Try a closet rod hanging shoe organizer like this: I've tried a few approaches, including some elaborate shoe trees. Hanging shoe organizers are inexpensive and the most compact and clutter-free solution I have found. Easy to move around as well.


5

Be prepared and buy a repair product in advance. Mending your lether shoe using duct tape or special glue is a nice idea. There are special repair glues (like Pattex repair gel in Europe) available in your hardware store or building center. Look for the attributes: waterproof flexible suitable for your materials How to apply? Normally these one component ...


5

The best hack for this is to use heat because heat makes things expand. All you will need is a hairdryer, a thick pair of socks (or two thinner pairs of socks), and your shoes. Put the socks on and then put the shoes on. Now, put the hairdryer on the highest heat. Blow dry the areas where the shoe needs to form to fit your foot (usually the toe and maybe the ...


5

You can prevent this from happening at all by putting a small square of soft, medium thickness fabric in between the back of your heel and the shoe.


5

Try mixing sugar/salt with rubber glue. Coating the bottom of the shoe should do the trick. The sugar/salt grains texture the glue like sand paper. The glue...umm...sticks the grains to the shoe... Just make sure you don't use caster sugar, as the grain size is important.


5

Weirdly enough, I was given this advice a week or so ago at the grocery store. The old man ringing me up told me that shining your shoes with bananas was the best way to do it. I believe it was using the peel to shine the shoe, then wipe off the residue. Haven't tried it but he swore by the method. If you give it a try, leave a comment with the results.


5

I put my shoes in the sun when they smell bad. This works well to prevent odor. The reason is that by keeping your shoes dry, you prevent bacterial growth that causes odor. If you live in a place that does not get a lot of sun, you can dry them next to a heater. Warning: Putting your shoes in the sun may affect the colors, but since your shoes are ...


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