Hot answers tagged

79

Here's a solution that my friend came up with: Take a bunch of Styrofoam cups Cut out the bottoms of the cups Stack them up Put the wide end of the top cup under the faucet, and the (cut open) thinner end of the bottom cup over the edge of the sink Place the urn directly underneath the end of your Styrofoam cup chain Turn on the sink At the end, your ...


68

Similar to @Shokhet's answer you can also use a clean dustpan, as shown below: Source: Trupser.com


26

Step 1: Get a smaller container which actually fits in the sink. Step 2: Fill it up. Step 3: Dump it into the larger container Step 4: Repeat Steps 1-3 as needed.


11

You are under the sink, so the following things should be readily available: bucket or large container towels pieces of plastic (old wrappers, garbage-bag, etc.) Let me first say; do this as quickly as possible. It doesn't have to be a solid fix, and you are gonna have some spillage. The main reason for doing this is to make sure the room doesn't have 10cm ...


8

This is really simple, but if you urn is very big, it is quite difficult to do :D take a smaller volume fill it with water from your tap pour the water from the smaller volume into your urn. Another variant: take a large plastic bottle (e.g. 1.5L+) cut the bottom and put the bottle in this way:


8

I learned this one at university (there were some bad kitchen habits there!). Roll your sleeves up and half-fill the sink (warm water is best) - it wont drain quickly by definition. With palms face down, place one hand over the other, and both over the plug hole. Pump like CPR half a dozen times... then watch the water drain away :-) You are effectively ...


7

If it is still full, snakes or the auger will work. If it drains over time, I highly recommend using baking soda + vinegar. Throw baking soda into the drain, pouring some hot water over it and wait about ten minutes. Then follow the soda with vinegar. After the reaction, toss water down it again. Repeat where necessary--it's frequently worked for me, on ...


6

Take a length of curtain wire: Unscrew the "hook" - then thread it GENTLY down the drain and "wiggle it" that should help a lot. Do not force it or push too hard as you will break the pipe if it is plastic.


6

Our kitchen sink clogged once after I used the disposal on potato peels. I ended up using the stopper, the plug used to fill the sink, like a plunger. So I would bet an actual toilet plunger would also work. I would recommend having one you only use on the sink though, don't want to be putting a dirty toilet plunger in your sink.


5

If the pipe is completely broken, crimp the end over or bend the pipe. I put a spade thru an underground water pipe in the garden many years ago and it shot a fountain of water 30 feet (9 metre) into the air.... so I called the water utility - a chap turned up and hit the pipe with a hammer until it stopped. Good lesson


5

I've used a flexible cutting board for this, if the faucet is above the lip of the sink. You can curve the flexible cutting board into a "U" shape, put one end under the faucet, and put the other end over the thing you're filling. Turn on the water slowly & carefully to make sure it's running the right direction. And since water will run downhill (isn't ...


4

I have an arrangement which looks similar to yours. Unfortunately, our counter is made of a type of granite which stains if we don't dry it immediately. I solve the problem by keeping smaller towels, sometimes called "hand towels," right up against the edge of the sink on both sides, leaving no exposed counter. Soap stains our counter too, so I place the ...


4

A temporary fix is to use the shut-off valve under the sink. A permanent fix would require taking the faucet apart. Sometimes cleaning pieces -- especially the washers -- will help the parts seal again, thus preventing dripping. However, more often, parts such as the washer or (depending on the type of faucet) must be replaced. This isn't generally ...


4

Use a toilet auger - a long bendy metal pipe that you stick in and turn round, made for going round bends.


4

To avoid dripping water from your hands outside of the sink basin, shake water off your hands (with your palms facing you and fingers spread, flick your fingers downward several times), then move your hands quickly to the towel (or use the dispenser quickly) before the remaining water can gather into a drip. It is also possible to extend the time for which ...


3

These are all great answers. I've also used a plain ol' baking tray that was not as wide as the bucket I was trying to fill up. Hook one of the lips of the baking tray under the faucet, and hang the tray over the edge so there's enough force from the other side of the tray trying to fall, to keep the water from splattering too much from out of the faucet. ...


3

First, the bad news. The surface of your sink has been etched. It has become pitted by the action of the sodium hydroxide. It cannot be washed off or away. Now, the not so bad news. It can be repaired Your best recourse is to polish your sink until the corroded area has been rubbed smooth. It will be a good job to do with a buffing wheel on a power drill ...


2

You can attach a length of garden hose to your kitchen sink using an adapter. This should allow you to fill any size container. http://www.wikihow.com/Attach-a-Garden-Hose-to-a-Kitchen-Faucet


2

If the blockage is a clump(s) (like food particles, etc.) use a plunger. But, if the blockage is not a clump(s) like I described, glue or attach 3 pipe cleaners at the holding area only and swish it around the drain. (only with blockages that are close to the drain entry) If you have some basic plumbing skills, open the drain and clean it your self. (Dig ...


2

Try a plunger, but be sure to use it properly. A plunger is not intended to force a blockage down the pipe, but to pull blocked material away from whatever is blocking it. Put the plunger against the drain opening. You need to have enough standing water to cover the head of the plunger. Push the plunger down so all air escapes from under it (you want ...


2

You can buy "Sink and Drain Unblocker" in 1 litre bottles for £1 in the UK. You normally use 500ml to unblock or 250ml for a "prophylactic" dose every couple of weeks. I've used the stuff and it does the job just fine. I also like to use dishwasher tablets to keep plugholes clean, for instance just drop one in the shower tray (away from where you stand) and ...


2

Kitchen drains usually have easily accessible (and hand-removable) siphons. If using a plunger (should be readily available in every household) doesn't work, the next easiest and cost-effective thing would be to open the two screws on the siphon (the S-shaped thing under the sink). Pull out what's inside the S-shaped pipe, flush it in the bathroom if you ...


2

A plunger may help. Use lots of water, in order not to just half-dislodge your material to have it recollect at some later, harder-to-reach place. If the plunger doesn’t help, you may need to take the trap apart and clean it, that’s the primary place for stuff to settle. Don’t worry, the hardest part is often reaching the trap, at least for the equipment ...


2

A large quantity of boiling water sometimes works. I usually avoid chemicals because they often cause wear and tear on the pipes (depends on the chemicals and the pipes but don't trust the advertised claims). A leaky pipe is a much bigger problem than a clogged pipe.


2

If you mean a sink that's sunk into a counter top, it's next to impossible not to splash the surrounding area when you use it. It helps if the sink is a good size and deep, but sadly, many modern sinks aren't, so if you've got a designer type 'sink' that's more like a shallow tray (like one I saw recently in a friend's house), then you need to keep a towel ...


2

The most common cause for excessive splashing from your sink is how the water comes pouring from the tap, our taps are generally simple-crafted ones that release the water in floods. The best way to resolve this issue is to invest in a tap aerator, these break up the flood of water in the same way ordinary shower heads do.The tap aerators usually come with ...


2

It sounds like you didn't use anything abrasive? Start by trying a powder or paste cleaner like comet or (better) barkeeper's friend. You left a film of crud on the surface, and it's not reasonable to expect it would come off with soap or the chemicals you've tried. Plus, vinegar and baking soda are so well known not because they are powerful, but because ...


1

For really tough clogs I suggest the use of a water bladder that goes on the end of your hose. Might be overkill for a typical clog in a bathroom drain, but if the clog is deep, hard to get to, past the p-trap a water bladder can do the trick. They are available in most hardware stores and online for about ten bucks. Included Image shows the principle ...


1

Short of taking the faucet apart and replacing the seat or other assembly, often times working the handle will cause it to stop leaking. Buildup inside will prevent it from completely closing. Working it back and forth with force can break up deposits allowing it to seat correctly. If there is light to moderate corrosion this may still work, but with ...


1

There is a product called Zip-It that I saw at Lowes which appears to be a long strip of barbed flexible plastic. It is meant to be pushed into the drain and then withdrawn, catching clogged material in the barbs for removal. I bought one but haven't had to use it yet so I can't testify to its value, but it appears to be a more flexible variation on your ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible