72

If you are looking to save money and go the easiest route, I would purchase a sleep mask. Years ago I worked the night shift for a few years and couldn't find any curtain that would truly make it seem like "night time". This is the only thing that worked for me. It may take a few nights to get adjusted but there are so many out there, that I am sure you ...


53

When I was a kid there was a bad heat wave and we used aluminum foil on the windows to keep the sun out. I don't know exactly what you mean by "do anything to my windows" but with a few cents worth of foil, you can make sure no light gets through.


42

For immediate relief, there are two similar things that I will try. First, I take a hot shower (make the shower as hot as you can withstand). Make sure to breath in and out deeply to fill your nasal passages and your lungs with steam. If that doesn't immediately make me feel better, I will also use a pot of boiling water. Just boil the water, drape a towel ...


29

Your sinuses are suffering from vasodilatation or nasal congestion. There's nothing to blow out that will unblock them because the passages themselves are shrinking due to the blood vessels increasing in size, and the nasal passages shrinking as a result. Normally your sinuses do this throughout the day following a nasal cycle that allows one side to rest ...


27

There are large paper blackout shades (see example on Amazon) that block out all the light on the window's I've used them on. They are a bit like giant sticky notes, with a sticky end that attached to the ceiling or window frame. During the day, when you want light, you use small plastic clips to gather up the extra paper material which lets light in. They ...


16

Instead of a decongestant take a cheap anti-histamine like diphenhydramine (Benadryl). In addition stopping the flow of mucus, the first generation anti-histamines make you so drowsy you'll have hard time staying awake even if you wanted to.


16

I had an eye surgery a while back and needed to black out a room under similar conditions. Though in my case it was the morning sun I was trying to black out. I have tried 2 methods. Foil/Paper Do you care if its visible from the outside? I used tin foil taped directly on the window. Blacked out completely. However, people will notice the crazy person ...


13

Use double layer of black garbage bags I have used double layer of black garbage bags in the past. I've fixed the bags with black tape that doesn't stick much to avoid leaving marks. However, over time with many season change, this tape unglued by itself. I guess paint tape would be better for this, but I'm not sure it would not unglue over long period of ...


13

These are some tricks that work for me: Having a cold beverage to drink (while driving, but carefully) works very well for me. I guess it's better if it has caffeine, I usually use Coke, but even water works. Anything that makes you stay more active, e.g. eating a candy once in a while, those that will last some minutes in your mouth (Halls, for example) ...


13

The only safe option is to avoid getting into this situation in the first place with better planning. If you do end up like this, the only safe thing to do is pull over and rest. Nothing else will allow you to drive safely when tired.


12

I also faced similar problem when I was in Rajasthan last year. You can use following tips to make your life a bit easier: Do whatever you can to prevent excessive heat build-up in your room. During the hot daytime use blinds to keep out sunlight and keep the windows closed if the temperature outside is much hotter than inside. At night time, if the ...


11

Personally, I have very often reached out to my bedside table and found some object like a book, box of tissues, drink coaster etc, then I throw it across the room into a location where it doesn't belong. In the morning, when I wake and get out of bed, I immediately see the object and it forces my brain to reconstruct the thought process that led to it being ...


10

I have just finished dealing with this same problem last week, here are a few things that helped me get over it: Put on some chap stick and breath through your mouth. Don't go too crazy with the decongestants, you could end up "crashing hard" and prolonging the congestion period. Wasabi and horseradish are really good at decreasing the swelling in your ...


9

My mother used to cut an onion and place it on a plate near my bed. You could try that. I also like to have something soft like a towel under my pillow. That way my head is a bit more upwards, instead of lying down flat. It makes sleeping more comfortable for me.


9

Some people simply don't realise how much noise they make, or how much it impinges on others. I've found - empirically, & without ever actually falling out with any noisy neighbours long-term - that one good lesson is to make your own loud noise while they're trying to sleep. Whether this takes the form of some hefty DIY at 6am, or putting the hifi ...


9

Sleep mask Yes, sleep mask is best (economic and effective). Canopy If you find sleeping mask uncomfortable, try to build a canopy (DIY will be economic) as seen in below image. DIY cost may vary between $50 - $200, while readymade will cost >$200


8

I would recommend using some form of nasal irrigation before going to bed. The idea is to run a mild salt solution through your nasal passages which clears stuffiness out and helps disinfect and thus de-inflame. It sounds kind of gross, but it really works well for me. Without making any specific product recommendations, there are several inexpensive ...


6

When you are about to yawn just touch the tongue with one of your fingers. The saltiness does the magic; it's highly unlikely that someone will carry salt in pocket, but a finger does the trick. That's my hack for preventing a yawn. I hope you find it useful.


6

Build a frame from some lengths of wood, to fit in the window opening. Cover with a few sheets of paper, or some plywood. Maybe some rubber foam around the edges to close any remaining gaps. Add two handles to make it easy to move this frame. Insert at night, remove in the morning. It's a bit more effort to build, but it's much faster to remove in the ...


6

If you want all the light-blocking of tin foil, and all of the subtlety of not having a shiny surface behind your window, consider "blackfoil" or "cinefoil." It's essentially aluminum foil, but with a matte black surface. It's generally used in theater lighting to block stray beams which might otherwise be escaping from the stage lights (or similar uses). On ...


6

Lie on your back. Stick your arm up and point at the ceiling. Let your elbow lock, so your arm stays straight up, balancing. If you accidentally fall asleep, your elbow will "unlock", your hand will drop straight down, and you'll gently smack yourself in the face. I've done this and it keeps me awake! Makes me laugh every time, too. Here's a quick video I ...


6

You're probably experiencing the reason air conditioning (cooling) is so widespread in regions where weather gets into the high 30s (C) or higher on a routine basis: regardless of daytime coping methods, sleep is disturbed by excessive heat. Given genuine air conditioning isn't an option for you, you might try some alternatives. A fan is the place to start,...


6

My standard method is when I notice I am beginning to fall asleep, I open a bag of very crunchy snacks (Corn Nuts!) and eat ONE every 60 seconds. The stimulation of the crunching wakes up the brain and watching the digital clock for the one-minute mark helps. But as I drive and eat, I also begin to look for a place where I can safely get off the road and ...


6

If you have a smart watch or health watch, those can frequently be used as alarm clocks that vibrate. I find it very effective as something vibrating on your wrist in the middle of the night is quite disconcerting.


5

I have this problem most of the time because of allergic rhinitis - I do use a steroid spray, but sometimes, the sinuses get blocked because of a cold or because the pollution's high, and I start to feel muzzy and a bit dizzy. I put off doing the following, its such a faff and makes my fringe (bangs for folks from the USA) frizzy, but when I do force myself ...


5

I tend to create nose plugs out of tissue paper... it's not pretty, but its the running mucus which keeps me awake not the stuffy part. Once they're in my nose (big enough so they are easy to pull out).. then it gives me the chance I need to fall asleep. Good luck.


5

Proven aids to falling asleep faster: Sleep alone; a bed partner will disturb with movements, snoring, talking, and may distract with other bedroom activities. Avoid backlit or self-lit displays (computer, cell phone/tablet, TV, etc.) for an hour before bedtime. Eliminate caffeine (coffee, tea, sodas) for at least the last six hours before bedtime; ...


5

This an ancient problem, and the solutions falls into various categories like: Stop the origin of the sound – Talk to the neighbour... Block out the sound – Use ear plugs, noise canceling headphones, reinforce walls, building a (more or less) soundproof cubicle around your bed Move further away from the sound – If possible, change the room you sleep in, to ...


5

Lower your thermostat a few degrees during sleeping hours, so you don't get too warm under the blankets. Then turn it back up for the morning -- or, if it's a modern thermostat, program the settings for sleeping hours (and while you're away for school or work) and save some money on heat.


5

I don't want to turn this into WebMD but I think your question should be treated as more than a life hack. I would consult with a doctor since what you are experiencing sounds like a reaction to something else. To quote Dr. Rosenberg "There are many reasons for tossing and turning. These include sleep apnea, chronic pain, periodic limb movement and acid ...


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