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9

Get a sturdy tray with a rim. I would recommend a model that can be cleaned easily (e.g. plastic) and is rather sturdy, so that it doesn’t warp or bend when it’s lifted up or set on the bed. That will give you basically a “table without legs”, or a solid surface on which you can place lots of different things that are prone to spilling, rolling away or ...


4

There's a good chance that the fabric dye used in your trousers has failed. Notice that the discolouration is lighter than the rest of your trousers which is an important characteristic of fading. Stains are always darker than the original colour of the fabric. Since your situation involves an area that is lighter, it indicates that a combination of wear ...


4

For removing hair and fluff from garments I find it effective to wind sellotape/scotch/parcel tape around my hand, sticky side out, and then pat the garment down. It may be easier to wear it or lay it out flat on a fluff free surface. If it's likely that this item will find its way into the wash again with the same item that caused the problem perhaps try ...


3

First, the bad news. The surface of your sink has been etched. It has become pitted by the action of the sodium hydroxide. It cannot be washed off or away. Now, the not so bad news. It can be repaired Your best recourse is to polish your sink until the corroded area has been rubbed smooth. It will be a good job to do with a buffing wheel on a power drill ...


2

You need to have 3 items to clean up your carpet 1. Denatured alcohol 2. Any water based cleaning detergent 3. A piece of towel Method. Pour some denatured alcohol on to the piece of towel and gently blot the stain spot and do this for some time and then pour some cleaning detergent onto the piece of towel and do the same blotting and you will notice the ...


2

First, unplug the laptop and remove the battery (or, it it's not removable, open the case and disconnect one wire from the battery). Also remove the clock battery. This prevents damage due to short-circuit and electrolytic corrosion. Now, take the time to wash the spill from the laptop with distilled water. Remove the HDD and loudspeaker, if possible, but ...


2

It sounds like you didn't use anything abrasive? Start by trying a powder or paste cleaner like comet or (better) barkeeper's friend. You left a film of crud on the surface, and it's not reasonable to expect it would come off with soap or the chemicals you've tried. Plus, vinegar and baking soda are so well known not because they are powerful, but because ...


1

Although Stephie's answer about the bed tray (or bed table) is probably the best answer, I also want to suggest a very inexpensive lifehack. If you have plastic trash bags, you can lay one out underneath your food before eating. It is much bigger than paper or butter paper, and liquids will not penetrate it. Also, plastic trash bags are very inexpensive, can ...


1

If the bench is unpainted metal, you can simply scrape the dried correction fluid off with a knife or other blade. Be gentle so you don't scratch the metal surface too.


1

Remove any sand or dirt from the soles Take out any additional inlay soles (if there are any) Put a dab of laundry detergent right onto the stains Throw them into the washing machine (no additional detergents in the chamber or you risk excessive foaming) Start a short low temperature program. I have knit shoes, too, and washed them 3 times already. They ...


1

You can use salt water to remove tea stains from carpet.take one glass of water ,mix two spoons of salt and boiled it for ten minutes.after boiling throw the some quantity of water on the stain leave it for five minutes then rub it .


1

You may find that ultraviolet light from sunlight will cause the stain to fade away on its own. If you want to hurry the process up, a variety of oxygen based bleaching agents are found in proprietary products; these work to break down the pigments in the stain, rendering it invisible If attempting to clean the carpet using a wet solution, take care that ...


1

You can use vinegar to remove tea stains from carpet. Make a vinegar solution with the ratio of 1 cup of vinegar and two cup of water and wash the stain with this solution.


1

Here is a link to the CDC guidelines on laundry in health care facilities. I hope this helps https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/environmental/background/laundry.html The key points are: contamination from dirty laundry is very rare dealing with getting the dirty linens to the place where they are washed is more important than the actual ...


1

Ethanol, as in hand sanitizer, as @QuestionEverything sugeests, is an effective first step. However, to get "black" ink, a number of different dyes are used, so other solvents may be needed in order to remove residual colors. In order, I'd try: Ethanol or isopropanol. Since hand cleaner is usually ~70% ethanol, 90% or more isopropanol, found in most ...


1

Use some kind of sanitizer (yea, the one you use to clean you hands!) Just apply some in the ink stain and wash, and apply again and wash, Boom! Stain's gone! Alternative; Dip the stained portion in milk overnight, wash in the Morning,it'll surely go!


1

I think that you're out of luck. The only way to dissolve the oil will also dissolve any ink on the pages of the book and probably will destroy the binding if it is case-bound (hard cover) as well. If the contents of the book are valuable, you can store it in the refrigerator to prevent the oil from becoming rancid until you transcribe the content. If you ...


1

Normal bleach or oxygen products like Oxyclean won't remove rust; in fact, they'll make it worse. If you don't have access to "Iron Out", oxalic acid will convert the rust into a soluble form that comes out with ordinary detergents. Pretreat the stain, wait until it's no longer visible, then wash with bleach-free detergent. That should cover it.


1

"Elbow grease" can help, i.e. scrubbing. An old toothbrush makes a good tool for scrubbing gently, but persistently, with vinegar, or better yet, citric acid (also sold as sour salt in the baking section of groceries). Lestoil might also help. Be careful not to scrub so much that it raises the nap of the fabric.


1

Whenever I have this sort of oily stain on clothes I use pure orange oil. In Australia it is readily available in supermarkets. Rub it in and then wash in washing machine. Almost always works. With shoes I would do the same on a trial stain and then get some warm soapy water and remove the orange oil and stain and then let it dry. This is a suggestion but I ...


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