A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.

Hot answers tagged

23

Use gloves that don't cover your fingers. (Something like these; they're also used by some when playing the piano.) Intermittently move one hand to under the blanket to warm it up. Increasing circulation can also help keep your fingers warm. To do this, take a walk every now and then.


23

The obvious household item would be garbage bags — they are found in most homes (advanced recyclers excepted), they are waterproof, and they are large enough to stick a foot in and cover a fair bit of your leg. Tie them to your trouser legs with an elastic, with paperclips, with sticky tape or anything you have on hand. Hopefully your shoes can stand the ...


21

Water usually only penetrates the outer layers of dead wood, so your best bet is to use a knife or hatchet to strip away the damp outer layer. Gather some kindling, dead wood that is about as wide as your finger or less. Pine will usually make a great fire starter, the sap/resin is flammable after it is heated. Use a sharp knife/hatchet to strip away as ...


19

If you have a heated windscreen, stick that on first, it'll loosen the ice from surface it's stuck to and it'll just slide off with a little push. If you don't have heated windscreen, still stick your heaters on full and point them at the windscreen. Any heat is going to help. With a scraper, work from one side and make sure you're scraping underneath the ...


19

The fog comes from water condensing on the windshield or windows. The problem is that the air inside the car is warmer and/or wetter than outside. (e.g., https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=1511) One of the faster ways is to lower your windows to lower the temperature in the car, and decrease the humidity by bringing in outside air. This may ...


18

Look at how other people have solved the problem of making snow slide off. Or rather, of making themselves slide off of snow. Meaning, wax that snow shovel like a pair of skis or a snowboard. You can get serious and do it with actual ski wax, but auto detail wax would help as well. Even a quick Turtle Waxing will help.


17

That's the dew freezing on. If you throw a waterproof cover over the windshield, hardly any dew will accumulate, and the problem will be mostly nil. The closer the cover hugs it the better.


15

Since the fog comes from moisture inside the car a simple solution is to dehumidify the car by filling an old sock with kitty litter and placing it inside the car in an inconspicuous place like under a seat. You might want to use an old pair of socks and double wrap the kitty litter. Video from Huffington post of the kitty liter trick But did you know ...


15

Your 2 main options will probably be making a sled and/or snow shoes. A sled can be fashioned from a number of household items, you basically just need something that is relatively light weight and flat to convex. A large plastic trashcan lid should do the trick nicely without any modification if you're only using it for short slides. Snow shoes will need ...


14

Install voice dictation software, some of it is really rather good once trained, and get a headset with a microphone and headphones, (not in ear ones), this will help keep your ears warm as well - you can then keep your hands under the quilt most of the time.


12

A great hack for this problem is to use non-stick cooking spray. This will do exactly what it does with pans, it will make the snow not stick. You just have to spray a generous amount of the spray on each side of the shovel. This works for both plastic and metal shovels. It might even work with shovels on the beach during the summer, so they don't get sand ...


11

Cover your windshield with aluminium: Applied on a windshield, your car will look like this: It will prevent any dew freezing on in most scenarios (it won't work against heavy snowfall and blizzards, naturally). However, even if a lot of snows falls on top of it, removing the cover will still take care of most of the freezing.


11

I do not think keeping the heat off until the engine got warmer would help. I would suggest a plug in engine warmer, they are cheap and easy to install. They cut the warm up time for your engine by half or better and also help preserve your engine in really cold climates. Parking in the sun if you can also helps.


10

The best way to get ice off your windshield is to heat your car up. When I lived in Wisconsin I used to turn on my car with the defroster (AC off) on full blast, go back and have a shower/get dressed, then come back and the ice would just slide off.


9

There is a couple tried and true methods used of varying difficult from living in AK and ND. 1) Install a storm door. This will provide other additional benefits as well. Should have no frozen up key lock issues after that. $80 to hundreds of dollars, much easy to install yourself than a framed door. 2) Go to a keyless lock. $60 to hundreds. Just keep in ...


8

2 mil or thicker plastic works great. Just stick it up with duct tape and forget about it. If the wind is strong, you can use furring strips and staples to tack down the edges. If the wind isn't too strong, you can use a window insulator kit to accomplish the same - some even offer pre-cut, pre-tapped panels that can just be rolled out. Try to get the 3M ...


8

I'm well known among friends and family for always having cold hands. It's rare that I meet someone with hands colder than mine, other than my mom. I used to move one hand, then the other beneath a blanket, but I've recently found that that doesn't work so well. At least compared to this other method I've found. The problem seems to be that my shoulders ...


8

You can make snow gaiters out of some household materials. Take some plastic wrap (the thin transparant material typically used for sealing food items in containers to keep them fresh over a longer period of time). Wrap some of this around each of your legs and shoes except the sole because you don't want to slip on the snow. I am trying to explain that you ...


8

I think the kettle advice is just so it doesn't get into contact with the heating coil. I have a kettle that has a covered coil and it works fine with those, but you have to keep it in there for a while (it still needs a few minutes to completely dissolve, there is no instant solution). Due to inequal heating in most microwaves I would not recommend this,...


8

Doritos Use Doritos (or other chips) as a fire starter. It turns out that the chemicals, powdered flavors, and oil in the chips make the perfect combination for combustion and snack. If you change your mind, you can always eat them. See the videos demonstrating it: Camping Tip: A Doritos Fire [GoPro Video] Confirmed by Mental Floss Read more: Use ...


8

Pour lukewarm water over the door seals to melt the ice. Your car is waterproof so this will not harm it and lukewarm water shouldn't risk damaging your ice cold window.


8

Rule #0) Dress in layers. The rest of the rules won't work without this pre-requisite. Rule #1) Stay dry. Your outermost layer should block water but also be breathable so your sweat can escape. Your innermost layer should wick away water. Wool or polyester work well for that. Rule #2) Keep out the wind. Your outermost layer should also block wind. Try ...


7

Duct-tape My personal favourite for a lot of 'let's fix this quick-and-dirty' situations. No cutting involved, again available at most hardware stores. It's quite strong and will hold a lot of wind. Applying multiple layers is usually a good idea to keep it airtight.


7

Condensation is formed when warm air meets the cold glass and the water vapour in the air condenses into water droplets. There are a few ways you can mitigate this: Warm the glass. This is extremely energy-inefficient (with the associated expense and detriment to the environment that that implies), but warming the glass by pointing a fan heater at it or ...


7

Depends whether you have a power supply nearby, but I always use a hairdryer in such situations - warm water can work, but it depends how cold it is, because sometimes it refreezes quickly and exacerbates the problem.


7

They just need a localised physical shock. Try slapping with a wooden ruler, flat side on & not so hard that you burst it. The clicker is a nucleation site, the shock waves start the reaction going. Once started, the rest will join in of its own accord.


6

Heat the area where the pipe is frozen. Here are some tips: Drape a heating pad over the pipe (assuming it is dry on the outside) Use a hair dryer on the area Place a space heater in a safe place near (but not dangerously close to) the pipe Running the water down the line will help the process go more quickly. (Running water is not frozen water, and ...


6

You could try: From Super User SE: Maybe you can use something like an USB powered hand warmer. Although, I would try to solve the underlying problem. Cold fingers usually mean bad circulation there. Do you smoke? Perhaps you should move your chair or change your keyboard so that your blood flow is not restricted? Heated accessories for your ...


6

If you have a high-proof alcoholic beverage (not sweet; sugar will gum up the works later), that can work as deicer, but dry out the lock afterwards.


6

You could try using "pogies". These are sleeves that are attached to your handlebars, allowing you to slip your hands in and out easily. Pogies allow you to go barehanded when you would normally need gloves and to wear light gloves when you would normally need heavy mitts.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible