Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
50

Usually jars with stiff lids are fresh from the store and have been packed with the contents under lower pressure than the outside air i.e a vacuum. This pressure difference can increase the resistance presented by the thread and can make opening a jar for the first time difficult. This approach that can be taken if a little damage to the lid is acceptable ...


42

You can wear rubber gloves and open it; usually, the extra grip helps. Run hot water over the lid. The heat will make the lid expand temporarily and it'll be easier to open. Put the lid on hot water (works as the above method) Hold the jar horizontally and slap the lid


42

Wikipedia has a nice solution: Household scissors or a utility knife are sometimes used to open difficult packaging. Tin snips are effective for tough plastics; the higher mechanical advantage of compound metal snips make it possible to cut such packages open even using little hand strength. These packages can also be opened with an ordinary ...


23

I have found it easiest to run a razor knife / utility knive along two adjacent sides, avoiding the sealed edge. The plastic is very hard and durable where the seal is, but it is relatively thin if you move in a bit from the seal. Cutting along two adjacent sides in an "L" formation allows for easier access to the product, and helps to avoid getting cut by ...


21

It's all about location, location, location! There are a couple of things that will aid the growth of mold and bacteria and it is best to try and prevent these conditions being met in order to prolong the freshness of the bread. The things that I can think of are: Heat - Don't allow the bread to be in a warm / hot location, room temperature is fine. Light ...


20

Twist one of the handles until it becomes hard, then use it to push that handle through the knot.


19

Cheap aluminum carabiners are what I use; they're available in different sizes for about $1 or less (you don't need the expensive ones for climbing). Not only can they grab eight or more plastic bags to carry them, but they keep the bags from spilling their contents in the trunk. For individual items, keep some bags in the car.


19

Breathe on your finger tips (not blow; breathe. like breathing on a cold window to fog it up.) before using them to pull at the plastic bag. Slightly moistening your fingertips provides greater friction and therefore a better chance of success. You can also attempt to dig in to the bag with your fingernails if they are sufficiently sharp.


18

First, make sure the jar (and lid) are clean. A dusty jar can make it hard to maintain a firm grip. Then make sure your hands are clean, for the same reason. If your hands are too dry, you may also struggle to maintain a firm grip. That said, you don't want them to be wet (or covered in grease / lotion / corn husker's friend) either - if rubbing your hands ...


16

I hope you're not camping without a knife. A sturdy knife can be used to slice the top off. Be careful of the edges! If you don't have a knife or anything else sharp your options are limited. Your best bet might be to find a pointy rock, and bash it into the top of the can with another rock, gradually 'chiseling' out the top of the can. But if you've ...


16

You can easily open tight jars lid with duct tape. DYI . I have personally tested and worked in first attempt itself. TIP: Place the jar on flat surface and hold if it contains liquid. Here are the 11 summarized ways to open the tight jars lid.


15

Use the freezer. It works well. I know you said you don't like to do that, but that's what I do. Whenever we buy bread, whatever kind it is, if it has been out a couple of days I put it in the freezer. You don't have to thaw it out before using it. Sandwich goodies or your hands are usually enough to thaw. If not, let it sit a couple of minutes. It thaws ...


11

Use a small square of damp neoprene (or rubber) to grip the lid. Knocking or tapping the lid on the worktop while turning it can help unstick really tightly sealed lids.


9

I ran across this video some time ago, and I feel it is relevant to this question. If you have absolutely nothing but you can find a flat rock, you can get the can open by rubbing the top against the rock and abrading / sanding away the seal on top of the can: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XG-yZT3VH0M


9

You can open a jar by first putting a rubber band around the lid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMTUnsbZelI More info on this other Lifehacker site.


9

You mentioned using clear plastic bags for your cables. I've been doing this for years. I use one cable per bag, to prevent tangling. (It works even better if you leave the ends sticking out of the mostly-zipped-up bag). Then I either write on the bag what the cable is, with a thick, black, permanent marker, or I slap a rectangle of silver duct tape on the ...


8

What often works for me is: grab each "side" of the knot between thumb and index finger of respective hands. "Work" the knot by twisting it back and forward repeatedly. i.e. counter rotate hands first one way then the other. After some time it will loosen and you can then grab a loop of the knot and pull it free.


8

Rule #1: bag everything. doubled. A trick I've used, although this won't work up flights of stairs, is to put all bag handles over a broom handle. Just be sure not to tilt the broom in a way that allows bags to fall off the open end.


7

Is it cheating to invest in a jar opener. Here are lots of them --- pick one. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1/176-5905764-2208615?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jar+opener My personal favorite -- a bit pricy but works great --- is:\Swing-A-Way 711BK Comfort Grip Jar Opener, Black I have severe arthritis and this always works for me ...


7

Put a spoon under the lip of the lid, and lever it up a bit (you're not popping off the lid, just depressurizing the vacuum). You'll be able to unscrew the lid now. My grandmother originally taught me this trick but I found a step by step guide (along with a photo) on Lifehacker: Hold the spoon in one hand and the jar firmly in the other. Nestle the spoon ...


7

I've used a medium-large sized backpack to lug groceries in the absence of available transportation. A large backpack can easily fit in a weeks worth of groceries safely. A bonus is the environmental friendless of not needing any bags (and cost saving if you live in a place that charges extra for grocery bags). Below is an image of a smallish pack that ...


6

You can usually turn the bottle upside down and stand it on its lid. So once you get to the point where there's a little remaining ketchup/mayonnaise and it won't come out, just store the bottle upside down. After a few hours, any remaining ketchup/mayonnaise will have fallen down to the lid. Then the next time you need ketchup/mayonnaise, you can ...


6

Camping without two can openers is like clapping with one hand. As Tom mentions in his answer, you can use a knife like a can opener. Poke the knife through the top of the can, and rock it back against the rim of the can, go around just like a can opener. Of course if you are looking this answer up online, at the time of need, forget the can and order a ...


6

This may not be a life hack as it describes using an adhesive agent, but it is a great fix for the sticker problem. I am not certain it was designed to fix stickers so this may still be a hack... but nonetheless, here is my answer: Elmer's makes a "rubber cement" which is basically a contact cement. I have used this to create stickers out of normal paper ...


6

Same answer, different version - stick the tip of your tongue out, touch it between index finger and thumb, then separate the bags. Works every time, so long as you're not too worried about what bacteria or virus particles might be present on your fingers at the time... I don't do this any more, I always re-use the more expensive, bag for life, plastic bags, ...


6

I don't eat much bread, but I always buy a large sliced loaf, and I do freeze it, usually splitting the bag and freezing half, double wrapped in plastic bags, keeping the other half in the fridge. Its surprising how quickly bread defrosts - if you only want a couple of slices, its possible to crack off a couple from a frozen loaf, pop them in a bag and they'...


6

This might not help for cycling, but when I walk with lots of bags of groceries, I put the handles through a carabiner. It's thick enough that it won't dig into your hand as much as plastic or cloth bags.


5

You're probably not necessarily looking for the 'best' way to open it, but one that will work when you're in the middle of nowhere, you just purchased an item from a store, and for obvious reasons don't carry scissors with you. Chances are you don't care for the cardboard packaging or imagery (and want to vent your frustration on a bad design). If you're ...


5

I've lived on the third floor of apartment building before with no elevator, so making one trip was a priority because who wants to climb those stairs over again or go outside in the cold/heat again. Some things I would do to hopefully make this happen are : never say paper when they ask paper or plastic ask to double bag them all or double bag them all ...


5

Get some reusable bags. I have the ones below and they are fantastic. They have nice big handles. I do not have to worry about them ripping. Plus they are better for the environment! Two ore three of these can fit a weeks+ worth of grocery's.


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